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Natural Sciences, Forestry and Agriculture - Alumni Profiles

Ryan Tewhey ’05
Ryan Tewhey ’05
Ryan Tewhey was included in Forbes magazine’s “30 under 30: Science” feature, which highlights high-achieving young scientists.
Stanley Falkow
Stanley Falkow
A college education ideally provides you with the intellectual tools you need to begin your life's work. It is also the place where many people learn to become independent in their ideas. Maine provided me with a wonderful undergraduate education taught by thoughtful, caring people.
David Anderson
David Anderson
UMaine alum David Anderson, former Maine Bound student and instructor who has carved a name for himself in mountain climbing and outdoor photography in the last 30 years, has traveled, climbed, filmed and led mountaineering expeditions around the world.
Randall Boone
Randall Boone
Wildlife ecologist Randall Boone earned two graduate degrees at the University of Maine, and is now an associate professor at Colorado State University.
Michael Michaud
Michael Michaud
A red-lettered warning comes with the Dorset Naga, one of the chile pepper varieties East Millinocket native Michael Michaud, a 1975 UMaine plant sciences graduate and agronomist, sells through Peppers by Post mail-order seed company in England: “Please use with the greatest of caution. Under no circumstances should one of these chiles be left where an unwitting person, especially a child, might handle them.”
Chanrasmey Neang
Chanrasmey Neang
At the University of Maine, Chanrasmey Neang discovered a way to let her history shape her future.
Dr. Bruce Stanton
Dr. Bruce Stanton
University of Maine alumnus Dr. Bruce Stanton of Dartmouth Medical School will deliver the 2011 Distinguished Honors Graduate Lecture on Feb. 23: “Arsenic: A Global Health Crisis. How Safe Is Our Water and Food?” We asked him to profile his career, which includes pioneering research in the cure for cystic fibrosis.
Amy Cotton
Amy Cotton
With the number of Americans age 65 or older expected to double in the next 25 years, geriatric nursing has become a critical part of the healthcare spectrum. But for Amy Cotton, a 1987 graduate of the University of Maine School of Nursing, caring for seniors has always been a priority.
Bob Crowley
Bob Crowley
Robert Crowley was recently named the winner of the 17th episode of CBS Survivor: Gabon–Earth’s Last Eden.
Tim Gallant
Tim Gallant
UMaine School of Forestry alum Tim Gallant is mapping a new course for himself and a local land development company. He recently was hired as the first Geographic Information Systems coordinator at Livermore Falls-based Main-Land Development Consultants, according to a recent report in the Sun Journal.
Nicole Mercier
Nicole Mercier
Nicole Mercier came to UMaine because it was convenient, but stayed because she found the educators in the forestry program exciting and encouraging.
Soren Hansen
Soren Hansen
Some of the most colorful species of marine ornamental fish soon will be the newest residents of the University of Maine's Center for Cooperative Aquaculture Research (CCAR) in Franklin, Maine.
Malcolm Hunter
Malcolm Hunter
To fully understand Malcolm “Mac” Hunter’s story, you need to know about the Richmond firehouse.
Simon Alexander
Simon Alexander
For alumnus and Maine large animal veterinarian Simon Alexander, it was a Holstein named Louine and the hands-on experience he got at UMaine that solidified his career choice.
Brenda Hall
Brenda Hall
Southern elephant seals that grow up to 20 feet long and weigh in at 4 tons aren't creatures you search for armed only with digging spoons and tweezers. But, then again, elephant seals weren't really what University of Maine glacial geologist Brenda Hall had set out to find.
Gretchen Heldmann
Gretchen Heldmann
Working part-time for Hampden throughout her senior year at the University of Maine as a forestry major, Heldmann tackled the town's computer system — or lack thereof. She developed a five-year, cost-saving action plan to phase in new computers and improve consistency of the 50 computers scattered throughout the town — from the municipal building to the public library.
Leigh Stearns
Leigh Stearns
Her trusty Dog Hudson at her side, University of Maine graduate student Leigh Stearns has spent the last two years exploring the jagged spires of ice and huge, yawning crevasses that make up the glacial ice fields of Greenland. Aimed primarily at tracking glacier speed and movement with the goal of understanding how ice sheets contribute to sea level, Stearns' research has led her to some of the most inaccessible and inhospitable places on the planet — and she has done most of it in a tee shirt and sandals.
Ann Dieffenbacher-Krall
Ann Dieffenbacher-Krall
Chironomids, or midge flies, begin their lives as larvae in lake sediment. As they grow, they shed their skin four times, then pupate. When they emerge as a swarm of adults, they mate, lay eggs and die. The extent of their adult lives occurs within a few days, but the lessons they can teach us about climate change endure, according to University of Maine researcher Ann Dieffenbacher-Krall.
 


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