Combined News

Hornsby to speak about Historical Atlas in Bar Harbor, Mount Desert Islander reports

University of Maine News - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 12:14

The Mount Desert Islander reported University of Maine geographer Stephen Hornsby will speak Aug. 25 about the “Historical Atlas of Maine,” as part of the College of the Atlantic’s final Coffee and Conversation event. Sarah Hall, COA’s Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Chair in Earth Systems and Geosciences, also will discuss the book in COA’s Dorr Museum of Natural History. The atlas, which is an extensive collection of maps, facts and photos, culminates a 15-year scholarly project led by UMaine researchers. Hornsby and historian Richard Judd edited the book that contains cartography by Michael Hermann.

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Sorg to participate in Drug Crisis Summit

University of Maine News - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 12:07

Marcella Sorg of the Margaret Chase Smith Policy Center will be among the state’s leaders participating in the Drug Crisis Summit organized by Gov. Paul LePage on Aug. 26. A news release about the summit is online.

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Climate surprises possibly in store for Antarctica, say Mayewski, Birkel

University of Maine News - Fri, 08/21/2015 - 15:15

Two different climate scenarios appear plausible for Antarctica in the 21st century, says Paul Mayewski, director of the Climate Change Institute at the University of Maine.

An examination of climate models as well as records of climate change developed through ice cores reveal a potential for future climate surprises in the Southern Hemisphere, he says.

Mayewski and fellow researchers with AntClim21 (Antarctic Climate in the 21st century), a Scientific Research Programme of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR), discovered potentially different forecasts as part of a published review they developed for the scientific community.

“In a nutshell, the review describes how the examination of past analogs compared to model projections differ, and the implications,” he says.

Climate models suggest that continued strengthening and poleward contraction of the Southern Ocean westerly wind belt will affect Antarctica’s 21st century environment, Mayewski says.

Ice core records suggest continued southward displacement of the westerlies, but weakened westerlies that allow greater entry of warm marine air masses into Antarctica.

Mayewski says implications for the ice core-derived past analog scenario are serious; wind-driven infiltration of warmed water into the coastal zone could result in abrupt collapses of glaciers in these regions and accelerated global sea-level increase.

Changes in the westerly jet structure could cause other surprises on a regional scale that could significantly affect weather extremes, ocean circulation, carbon uptake, sea ice extent and sea-level rise.

Evidence from Earth’s climate history supports the possibility of such a surprise in the rate of ice-sheet response and climate change in the Southern Hemisphere, he says.

For instance, around 14,500 years ago, global sea level rose by 20 meters, at a rate of 4 meters per 100 years. Marine sediment reconstructions and modeling studies indicate the rise was partially due to a rapidly collapsing West Antarctic ice sheet.

The review, titled “Potential for Southern Hemisphere climate surprises,” is in the Journal of Quaternary Science’s “Rapid Communication.”

Mayewski was joined in the study by AntClim21 researchers from the United States, including Sean Birkel of the Climate Change Institute, as well as scientists from the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand and Korea.

Contact: Beth Staples, 207.581.3777

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Workshops offered on preserving garden fruits, vegetables

University of Maine News - Fri, 08/21/2015 - 13:54

Want to preserve garden vegetables and fruits to be able to enjoy them throughout the year?

University of Maine Cooperative Extension staff and volunteers are offering hands-on Preserving the Harvest workshops that incorporate USDA-recommended food preservation methods, including hot water bath canning, pressure canning and fermenting.

Participants will make samples to take home. Fresh produce, canning jars and other canning equipment will be provided.

September workshops include:

  • Canning and Freezing Fruit Preserves, 5:30–8:30 p.m. Sept. 3, Frinklepod Farm, 244 Log Cabin Road, Arundel. Cost is $20 per person.
  • Boiling Water Bath Canning Tomato Salsa, 1–4 p.m. Sept. 4, Nezinscot Farm, 284 Turner Center Road, Turner. Cost is $25 per person.
  • Hot Water Bath Canning and Freezing, 6–9 p.m. Sept. 9, Messalonskee High School, 131 Messalonskee High Drive, Oakland. Cost is $25 per person.
  • Fermenting Vegetables, 6–8 p.m. Sept. 22, Old Orchard Beach High School, 40 E. Emerson Cummings Boulevard, Old Orchard. Cost is $24 per person.
  • Pressure Canning Vegetables, 5:30–8:30 p.m. Sept. 29, Traip Academy, 12 Williams Ave., Kittery. Cost is $25 per person.

Register at extension.umaine.edu/food-health/food-preservation/hands-on-workshops. For more information, or to request a disability accommodation, call 207.781.6099 or 800.781.6099 (toll-free in Maine).

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Alum survived Alaskan mudslide, Sun Journal reports

University of Maine News - Fri, 08/21/2015 - 13:51

Alum survived Alaskan mudslide, Sun Journal reports

The Sun Journal interviewed University of Maine graduate Dave Longtin, ’92, who survived Tuesday’s deadly landslide in Sitka, Alaska.

Longtin, a public works engineer who was inspecting culverts, ran to escape the mudslide. Two people died and one is missing, according to reports.

“[T]he guy I was running with turned around. He saw a house surfing on top of the mud. (Then that house disappeared into the mud.) There’s no evidence it was there. It’s gone,” Longtin is quoted as saying in the article.

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BDN covers hoop stars being inducted into Hall of Fame

University of Maine News - Fri, 08/21/2015 - 13:50

The Bangor Daily News reported that a number of former Black Bears are slated to be inducted into the Maine Basketball Hall of Fame on Sunday at the Cross Insurance Center in Bangor.

University of Maine hoop standouts slated to be inducted are Wayne Champeon, Liz Coffin, Steve Condon, Emily Ellis, Keith Mahaney, John Norris and Bob Warner.

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Maine Business School informational sessions previewed by TRJ

University of Maine News - Fri, 08/21/2015 - 13:49

The Republican Journal promoted two informational sessions about the new online Master’s in Business Administration program, as well as the traditional program, offered by the Maine Business School at the University of Maine.

The Sept. 10 session is 4–6 p.m. at the UMaine Hutchinson Center in Belfast and the Sept. 17 session is 4–6 p.m. at the D.P. Corbett Business Building on the Orono campus.

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UMaine mentioned in PPH piece about migrant education

University of Maine News - Fri, 08/21/2015 - 13:48

The University of Maine was mentioned in a Portland Press Herald article about children of migrant blueberry workers reaping an education through the Migrant Education Program, administered by the Maine Department of Education.

In addition to breakfast, lunch, snacks, tutoring and weekly field trips connected to the summer educational curriculum, children 14 and older are invited to tour UMaine on weekends.

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Gill shares conservation thoughts with Christian Science Monitor

University of Maine News - Fri, 08/21/2015 - 08:47

Jacqueline Gill, a paleoecologist at the University of Maine, was interviewed for a Christian Science Monitor article titled “In climate change era, new idea for conservation takes shape.”

“The question we’d really like to answer,” says Gill, “is whether geodiversity has corresponded to biodiversity through time – and how landform durability influences biodiversity.”

The article outlines a recent alternative approach to conservation that has been gaining momentum. It focuses on conserving biodiverse regions, rather than preserving specific species or communities of species. This allows researchers to focus on conserving landforms in regions that incorporate diverse geophysical traits.

Gill says the approach may not be appropriate for keystone species, which require species-specific intervention.

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Lambert explains dangers of late blight, WABI reports

University of Maine News - Fri, 08/21/2015 - 08:46

Dave Lambert, University of Maine research assistant, was interviewed by WABI about late blight, an infectious disease of plants that can be ecologically and economically devastating.

“It’s a very infectious disease,” says Lambert. “The organism produces thousands of spores in a single lesion. It occurs very rapidly. You can lose an entire crop in two weeks.”

To avoid an outbreak, Lambert recommends treating all crops early in the season.

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Computer engineering professor talks contra dancing with BDN

University of Maine News - Fri, 08/21/2015 - 08:45

Rick Eason, organizer of the Bangor contradance and professor of computer engineering at the University of Maine, talked with the Bangor Daily News about contra dancing in the state.

“It reminds me of those old movies, where people get dressed up on a Saturday night and the whole community comes together,” Eason said in the article. “It’s something you’ve gotta try before you say you don’t like it.”

Contra dance groups in Maine have recently sought to get more community members involved, including families and young people, the article states.

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STEM project to benefit Down East youth

University of Maine News - Wed, 08/19/2015 - 10:59

A new program based in Machias aims to immerse at least 600 10- to 18-year-olds in innovative, out-of-school science and math opportunities.

The three-year STEM Guides Downeast project is a collaborative effort among the Maine Mathematics and Science Alliance (MMSA), Axiom Education and Training Center and University of Maine Cooperative Extension 4-H, according to an Axiom Technologies news release.

STEM Guides Downeast will launch during a public event at 3 p.m. Sept. 1 at the University of Maine at Machias. Registration for the event is online.

Attending the event for UMaine Extension are Lisa Phelps, program administrator; Jennifer Lobley, a professor based out of Washington County who supports 4-H and volunteer development; and Greg Kranich, a 4-H science youth development professional who works with northern and coastal counties.

U.S. Sen. Angus King is expected to be on hand to celebrate the new partnership, and U.S. Sen. Susan Collins has been invited, the release states.

Funded by the National Science Foundation, STEM Guides Downeast is one of four regional models being developed and tested in Maine by MMSA. The model supports local people who are passionate about education and science to be STEM Guides and serve as informal science advisers and mentors to area youth.

STEM Guides will be based at the Axiom Education and Training Center where they will work with local partners to identify existing STEM resources and connect youth with opportunities in creative ways. Youth will participate in 4-H STEM programs and in science clubs based at libraries, schools and after-school programs.

“We always work in partnership with local people, projects and programs to show young people that they are surrounded by science,” says Jan Mokros, project director.

STEM Guides Downeast will be guided by a partners council that includes the University of Maine at Machias, Downeast Institute for Applied Marine Research and Education, 4-H, Sunrise County Economic Council, Washington County Government and local schools and libraries.

The full Axiom Technologies release is online.

Categories: Combined News, News

STEM Project to Benefit Down East Youth

University of Maine News - Wed, 08/19/2015 - 10:40

A new program based in Machias aims to immerse at least 600 10- to 18-year-olds in innovative, out-of-school science and math opportunities.

The three-year STEM Guides Downeast project is a collaborative effort among the Maine Mathematics and Science Alliance (MMSA), Axiom Education and Training Center and University of Maine Cooperative Extension 4-H, according to an Axiom Technologies news release.

STEM Guides Downeast will launch during a public event at 3 p.m. Sept. 1 at the University of Maine at Machias. Registration for the event is online.

Attending the event for UMaine Extension are Lisa Phelps, program administrator; Jennifer Lobley, a professor based out of Washington County who supports 4-H and volunteer development; and Greg Kranich, a 4-H science youth development professional who works with northern and coastal counties.

U.S. Sen. Angus King is expected to be on hand to celebrate the new partnership, and U.S. Sen. Susan Collins has been invited, the release states.

Funded by the National Science Foundation, STEM Guides Downeast is one of four regional models being developed and tested in Maine by MMSA. The model supports local people who are passionate about education and science to be STEM Guides and serve as informal science advisers and mentors to area youth.

STEM Guides will be based at the Axiom Education and Training Center where they will work with local partners to identify existing STEM resources and connect youth with opportunities in creative ways. Youth will participate in 4-H STEM programs and in science clubs based at libraries, schools and after-school programs.

“We always work in partnership with local people, projects and programs to show young people that they are surrounded by science,” says Jan Mokros, project director.

STEM Guides Downeast will be guided by a partners council that includes the University of Maine at Machias, Downeast Institute for Applied Marine Research and Education, 4-H, Sunrise County Economic Council, Washington County Government and local schools and libraries.

The full Axiom Technologies release is online.

Categories: Combined News, News

Redmond talks to Press Herald about Seaweed Festival

University of Maine News - Wed, 08/19/2015 - 10:35

Sarah Redmond, a marine extension associate with the Maine Sea Grant College Program at the University of Maine, spoke with the Portland Press Herald about the Maine Seaweed Festival to be held Aug. 29 in South Portland. Event organizers, including Redmond, held the first festival last year and hoped for a decent turnout, according to the article. About 1,500 people attended to learn more about and sample different varieties of seaweed, the article states. Redmond said the event was “a remembering of what we have right here in our own backyards.”

Categories: Combined News, News

LaBouff mentioned in Bustle article on how to feel more grateful

University of Maine News - Wed, 08/19/2015 - 10:34

University of Maine psychologist Jordan LaBouff was cited in the Bustle article, “10 ways to feel more grateful every day.” No. 10 on the list — “Be Humble” — mentioned research by LaBouff that was cited by Time magazine in 2012. LaBouff told Time that humility goes a long way in our personal lives and careers, according to the article. LaBouff, who led a team of researchers that highlighted the connection between being humble and helping others, said it’s difficult to be compassionate if you’re not modest, the article states.

Categories: Combined News, News

Kaye writes BDN op-ed on social security’s future

University of Maine News - Wed, 08/19/2015 - 10:33

Lenard Kaye, director of the University of Maine Center on Aging and professor in the UMaine School of Social Work, wrote an opinion piece for the Bangor Daily News titled, “Let’s keep the faith in Social Security’s future.” Kaye is a member of the Maine chapter of the national Scholars Strategy Network, which brings together scholars across the country to address public challenges and their policy implications. Members’ columns appear in the BDN every other week.

Categories: Combined News, News

Redmond Talks to Press Herald about Seaweed Festival

University of Maine News - Wed, 08/19/2015 - 10:13

Sarah Redmond, a marine extension associate with the Maine Sea Grant College Program at the University of Maine, spoke with the Portland Press Herald about the Maine Seaweed Festival to be held Aug. 29 in South Portland. Event organizers, including Redmond, held the first festival last year and hoped for a decent turnout, according to the article. About 1,500 people attended to learn more about and sample different varieties of seaweed, the article states. Redmond said the event was “a remembering of what we have right here in our own backyards.”

Categories: Combined News, News

LaBouff Mentioned in Bustle Article on How to Feel More Grateful

University of Maine News - Wed, 08/19/2015 - 10:12

University of Maine psychologist Jordan LaBouff was cited in the Bustle article, “10 ways to feel more grateful every day.” No. 10 on the list — “Be Humble” — mentioned research by LaBouff that was cited by Time magazine in 2012. LaBouff told Time that humility goes a long way in our personal lives and careers, according to the article. LaBouff, who led a team of researchers that highlighted the connection between being humble and helping others, said it’s difficult to be compassionate if you’re not modest, the article states.

Categories: Combined News, News

Kaye Writes BDN Op-Ed on Social Security’s Future

University of Maine News - Wed, 08/19/2015 - 10:09

Lenard Kaye, director of the University of Maine Center on Aging and professor in the UMaine School of Social Work, wrote an opinion piece for the Bangor Daily News titled, “Let’s keep the faith in Social Security’s future.” Kaye is a member of the Maine chapter of the national Scholars Strategy Network, which brings together scholars across the country to address public challenges and their policy implications. Members’ columns appear in the BDN every other week.

Categories: Combined News, News

Bangor Whoopie Pie Business

University of Maine News - Wed, 08/19/2015 - 09:25

Transcript

James Gallagher has friends in sweet places. Take Eliza Butler, co-founder of Specialty Sweets candy in Bangor and an alum of the Top Gun Entrepreneurial Accelerator Program at UMaine. It was on her recommendation that Gallagher joined the Top Gun program to help grow his business. As president and chief baker at the Whoopie Pie Cafe on Hammond Street in Bangor, he sells over 25 whoopie pie varieties, in addition to homemade breads and sandwiches. In this video, Gallagher talks about the Top Gun Program and his small business.

The Top Gun entrepreneurship accelerator is a five-month program that engages entrepreneurs in growing their businesses. Top Gun combines education, mentoring, pitch-coaching and networking opportunities. The program is a partnership of the Maine Center for Entrepreneurial Development, Maine Technology Institute, Blackstone Accelerates Growth and the University of Maine. UMaine organizes and hosts a Bangor region class and has also developed curriculum to support the statewide program. More information about Top Gun is online.

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