Combined News

BDN Advances Talks by Combat Trauma Psychologist

University of Maine News - Tue, 05/12/2015 - 10:30

The Bangor Daily News reported Dr. Jonathan Shay, a nationally recognized psychologist and author of two popular books on combat trauma and the trials of homecoming for veterans and their families, will give two public addresses at the University of Maine on May 13. Shay will speak to the fifth annual Conference of the Maine Military & Community Network at 9 a.m. on, “Psychology and Moral Injury in War.” He also will give a 6 p.m. keynote address, “Combat Trauma and the Trials of Coming Home.” Both are in Wells Conference Center on campus. “PTSD is not a bad description … [for] the very valid adaptations that occur when people were trying to take your life,” Shay said. “When those leak into life — that is PTSD. It’s not a fear syndrome … it’s a danger adaptation.”

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Hampden Family Earns Ninth Degree at Commencement, Weekly Reports

University of Maine News - Tue, 05/12/2015 - 10:29

The Weekly published a University of Maine news release about a Hampden-based family that at Commencement earned its ninth UMaine degree among six immediate members. On Saturday, Margaret McCollough received a bachelor’s degree in sustainable agriculture. She is the daughter of Catherine Elliott, a sustainable living specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, and Mark McCollough of Hampden, who met at UMaine in the 1980s and both hold two UMaine degrees. Margaret McCollough’s boyfriend Garth Douston, who she also met at UMaine, has a bachelor’s degree in sustainable agriculture. Margaret McCollough’s brother Aaron McCollough completed a bachelor’s degree in computer and electrical engineering and a master’s degree in computer engineering. While pursuing that degree, he became engaged to Morgan Burke, who completed her bachelor’s degree in wildlife ecology.

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WVII Interviews Dill About Insects Surviving the Winter

University of Maine News - Tue, 05/12/2015 - 10:29

Jim Dill, a pest management specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, spoke with WVII (Channel 7) about insects that most likely survived the winter. Dill said to impact the most insects, the winter needs to be cold with not a lot of snow on the ground. “We had a cold winter, but unfortunately we had lots of snow,” he said. “If you’re an insect and you’re down in the leaves and stuff and all of a sudden you’ve got 3 feet of snow on you; down there in the leaf litter where you are it’s probably 25–28 degrees even though the air temperature might be -20.” Dill said the winter may have increased the survival of ticks and maintained the survival of black flies, but may have harmed mosquitoes. He said although it’s hard to predict, early-season mosquitoes don’t seem as if they will be as bad as they normally are.

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Live Science Reports on Mayewski’s Antarctic Climate Change Research

University of Maine News - Tue, 05/12/2015 - 10:28

Live Science reported on climate change research conducted by a team of scientists including Paul Mayewski, director of the Climate Change Institute at the University of Maine. The article, “Million-year-old bubbles reveal Antarctica’s oldest climate snapshot,” focused on research led by John Higgins, a geochemist at Princeton University. Higgins’ co-authors included Mayewski; Michael Bender, also of Princeton; and Ed Brook of Oregon State University. The researchers uncovered a one-million-year-old ice core from Antarctic blue ice in a region called the Allan Hills, according to the article. Bubbles inside the ice provide a glimpse in Earth’s ancestral climate because gases such as carbon dioxide and methane were trapped and preserved inside the bubbles when snow fell in the past, the article states. The researchers said the core offers the oldest record of Earth’s climate from Antarctic ice.

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BDN Features UMaine Extension Video, Tips on Worm Composting

University of Maine News - Tue, 05/12/2015 - 10:27

The Bangor Daily News cited a University of Maine Cooperative Extension video for the article “Want compost? Let worms make it for you.” The worm composting video features UMaine Extension educator and professor Marjorie Peronto who offers tips on how to get started. Worm composting — or vermicomposting — is where earthworms eat and digest organic matter, such as food scraps, and turn them into usable compost, according to the article. “Worms can process about half their weight in food per day,” Peronto said.

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Bromley Quoted in Columbia Chronicle Article on Climate Change

University of Maine News - Tue, 05/12/2015 - 10:26

Gordon Bromley, a research assistant professor at the University of Maine’s Climate Change Institute, was quoted in a Columbia Chronicle article about a a meta-analysis by a University of Connecticut ecology and evolutionary biology professor that states the impact of global warming is more tangible and destructive than previously thought. Mark Urban’s study, which was published in the journal Science, states if global temperatures continue to rise at their current pace, up to one in six species will be in danger of extinction. “To pin the blame on our actions in such a stark way is appropriate but entirely new,” Bromley said of the study. “We’ve heard a lot about how climate is going to keep changing, but we’ve never looked at what the impact will be on species.”

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CCA to Broadcast Play that Unearths World of Mumbai Trash Pickers

University of Maine News - Tue, 05/12/2015 - 10:25

“Behind the Beautiful Forevers,” a gripping play about people living in a slum in Mumbai, will be broadcast live from London to the Collins Center for the Arts at the University of Maine at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 28.

David Hare’s play is based on the unflinching book of the same name that Katherine Boo wrote after she recorded the lives, dreams and devastations of residents in the makeshift settlement for three years. “Behind the Beautiful Forevers” won the National Book Award for nonfiction.

In the shadow of ritzy hotels surrounding the gleaming Mumbai airport, people who live in a slum next to a sewage lake are part of Mumbai’s informal rubbish collecting industry.

Zehrunisa and her son, Abdul aim to recycle enough rubbish to fund a proper house. Sunil, 12 and stunted, wants to eat until he’s as tall as Kalu, a scrap metal thief. Asha seeks to steal government anti-poverty funds to turn herself into a “first-class person” and her daughter, Manju wants to be the slum’s first female graduate. But their plans are fragile. Injustice and corruption reign. A global recession threatens the garbage trade and one slum-dweller makes an accusation that will destroy herself and shatter the neighborhood.

Since 2009, NT Live has transmitted the best of British theatre live from London to cinemas and venues around the world. The broadcasts are filmed in front of a live audience, with cameras positioned throughout the theatre to ensure cinema audiences get the best-seat-in-the-house view. Productions are transmitted via satellite to the CCA, then projected onto a 40-foot high-definition screen — one of the largest in the state.

For tickets, which are $18 for adults and $8 for students, visit collinscenterforthearts.com or call 581.1755, 800.622.TIXX.

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Maine Autism Institute Gets Additional Funds from Department of Education

University of Maine News - Tue, 05/12/2015 - 10:24

The Maine Autism Institute for Research and Education at the University of Maine will receive more than $150,000 from the Maine Department of Education to continue its work as the state’s first autism institute, according to a Maine DOE news release.

The funds are in addition to the $209,802 the department and UMaine’s College of Education and Human Development contributed to open the institute in 2014.

Autism is a developmental disability with varying degrees of severity that affects a person’s ability to communicate, to reason and to interact with others. An estimated 1 in 68 children is now being diagnosed with autism. The new funding will further the institute’s initial efforts to build statewide capacity to improve outcomes for young Mainers with autism, the release states.

Much of the funding will be used to expand training in evidence-based practices for teams from Maine school districts to help increase the academic and social success for autistic students.

The full Maine DOE release is online.

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Combat Trauma and the Trials of Homecoming for Veterans the Focus of Keynotes May 13 on Campus

University of Maine News - Tue, 05/12/2015 - 08:40

Dr. Jonathan Shay, a nationally recognized psychologist and author of two popular books on combat trauma and the trials of homecoming for veterans and their families, will give two public addresses at the University of Maine on May 13.

Shay will speak to the Fifth Annual Conference of the Maine Military & Community Network at 9 a.m. on, “Psychology and Moral Injury in War.” He also will give a 6 p.m. keynote address, “Combat Trauma and the Trials of Coming Home.” Both are in Wells Conference Center on campus.

Shay, one of the nation’s leading authorities on combat trauma and the trials of homecoming, is a psychiatrist who has specialized in treating combat veterans. He was a staff psychiatrist in the Department of Veterans Affairs Outpatient Clinic in Boston. He is in Maine for three days of meetings with veterans groups and community supporters, and public talks.

In his research, Shay found that viewing the experiences of combat veterans from perspectives found in Homer’s “Iliad” and “Odyssey” provide insight into both PTSD and what he has come to term “moral injury.” These insights led him to write “Achilles in Vietnam: Combat Trauma and the Undoing of Character” (1994), and “Odysseus in America: Combat Trauma and the Trials of Homecoming” (2002).

Shay is a recipient of a MacArthur Foundation Genius Grant. In 1999–2000 he led the Commandant of the Marine Corps Trust Study; in 2001, he was visiting scholar-at-large at the U.S. Naval War College; 2004–05, he was chair of ethics, leadership and personnel policy in the Office of the U.S. Army Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel, and was the 2009 Omar Bradley Chair of Strategic Leadership at the U.S. Army War College.

His visit to Maine is sponsored by the Maine Infantry Foundation, Maine Military & Community Network, Acadia Hospital, the University of Maine Humanities Center, the Bangor Daily News, and the law firms of Verrill & Dana in Portland, and Vafiades, Brountas & Kominsky in Bangor. The goals of the Odysseus in Maine project are to raise awareness about combat veterans’ experiences; train providers in best practices for serving combat veterans; forge a “way ahead” in dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder and other combat-related injuries; and instill an ethical leadership model.

Shay will be in Portland May 12, speaking to members of the Maine State Bar Association and the Maine Judiciary. The talk will keynote a Maine State Bar Association Veterans Committee continuing legal education programming exploring the Maine Veterans Court and related issues of importance to legal challenges faced by Maine’s veterans.

He also will meet with local veterans and counselors on the final day of his Maine visit.

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