News

GSBSE Director David Neivandt wins Genco Award

Grad School NEWS - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 10:12
On April 9th, 2014, at the Annual Banquet of the Pulp and Paper Foundation, Dr. David Neivandt received the Joseph M. Genco Award for his stellar research, teaching, and service. Dr. Neivandt is a Professor of Chemical Engineering and Director of UMaine's Graduate School of Biomedical Science and Engineering.

 

Award Citation: The Joseph M. Genco Award for Pulp and Paper Industry Support is given annually to the University of Maine employee who has demonstrated exemplary support of the Pulp and Paper Industry through either outstanding research that has the potential to significantly improve the viability of the industry, and/or through innovative student recruitment to help provide the next generation of Pulp and Paper Engineers and Leaders, and/or through innovative teaching that inspires current engineering students.
Categories: Combined News, News

Melting During Cooling Period

University of Maine News - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 09:53

A University of Maine research team says stratification of the North Atlantic Ocean contributed to summer warming and glacial melting in Scotland during the period recognized for abrupt cooling 12,900 to 11,600 years ago in the Northern Hemisphere.

Prevailing scientific understanding has been that glaciers advanced in the Northern Hemisphere throughout most of the Younger Dryas Stadial (YDS) — a 1,300-year period of dramatic cooling.

But carbon-dated bog sediment indicates the 9,500-square-kilometer ice cap over Rannoch Moor in Scotland retreated at least 500 years before the end of the YDS, says Gordon Bromley, a postdoctoral associate with UMaine’s Climate Change Institute (CCI).

“Our new record, showing warming summers during what traditionally was believed to have been an intensely cold period, adds an exciting new layer of complexity to our understanding of abrupt events and highlights the fact that there is much yet to learn about how our climate can behave,” Bromley says.

“This is an issue that is becoming ever more pressing in the face of global warming, since we really need to know what Earth’s climate system is capable of. But first we have to understand the full nature of abrupt climate events, how they are manifest ‘on the ground.’ And so we were compelled to investigate the terrestrial record of the Younger Dryas, which really is the poster child for abrupt climate change.”

Glaciers, says Bromley, respond to sea surface temperatures and Scotland is immediately downwind of the North Atlantic Ocean.

“Scotland was the natural choice as it lies within the North Atlantic Ocean — widely believed to be a driver of climatic upheaval — and thus would give us a robust idea of what really transpired during that critical period,” he says.

What the team found was that amplified seasonality driven by greatly expanding sea ice resulted in severe winters and warm summers.

While sea ice formation prevented ocean to atmosphere heat transfer during winters, melting of sea ice during summers created a stratified warmer freshwater cap on the ocean surface, he says. The increased summer sea surface temperature and downwind air temperature melted the glaciers.

Bromley says this research highlights the still-incomplete understanding of abrupt climate changes throughout Earth’s history.

“Ever since the existence of abrupt climate change was first recognized in ice-core and marine records, we’ve been wrestling with the problem of why these tumultuous events occur, and how,” he says.

Kurt Rademaker, Brenda Hall, Sean Birkel and Harold W. Borns, all from UMaine’s Climate Change Institute and School of Earth and Climate Sciences, are part of the research team. So too is Aaron Putnam, previously from CCI and now with Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University/Earth Institute. Joerg Schaefer and Gisela Winckler are also with Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and Thomas Lowell is with the University of Cincinnati.

The team’s research paper, Younger Dryas deglaciation of Scotland driven by warming summers, was published April 14 on the “Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences” website.

Contact: Beth Staples, 207.581.3777

Categories: Combined News, News

UMaine’s 2014 Honorary Degrees

University of Maine News - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 08:42

Two icons in literature and music in Maine — international best-selling author Tess Gerritsen and singer-songwriter David Mallett — will receive honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degrees and share remarks at the 212th Commencement May 10 at the University of Maine.

Mallett will address the 10 a.m. ceremony; Gerritsen will address the 2:30 p.m. ceremony, both in Harold Alfond Sports Arena.

“We are so pleased that Dave Mallett and Tess Gerritsen will join us for the 212th Commencement and share perspectives from their remarkable careers with the UMaine community,” says University of Maine President Paul Ferguson. “It is UMaine’s distinct privilege to present honorary degrees in recognition of the contributions of Tess and Dave to the arts and humanities.”

Tess Gerritsen earned a medical degree at the University of California, San Francisco in 1979. It was while on maternity leave from her work as a physician that she began to write fiction.

In 1987, her first romantic suspense novel, Call After Midnight, was published. She then wrote eight more romantic thrillers and a screenplay, Adrift, which aired as a 1993 CBS Movie of the Week starring Kate Jackson. In 1996, Gerritsen debuted on the New York Times best-seller list with her first medical thriller, Harvest. She has since published the suspense novels: Life Support (1997), Bloodstream (1998), Gravity (1999), The Surgeon (2001), The Apprentice (2002), The Sinner (2003), Body Double (2004), Vanish (2005), The Mephisto Club (2006), The Bone Garden (2007), The Keepsake (2008; UK title: Keeping the Dead), Ice Cold (2010; UK title: The Killing Place), The Silent Girl (2011) and Last To Die (2012.) Her books have been published in 40 countries. More than 25 million copies have been sold around the world.

In addition, her books have been top-three best sellers in the United States and abroad. She has won both the Nero Wolfe Award (for Vanish) and the Rita Award (for The Surgeon). Critics around the world have praised her novels as “pulse-pounding fun” (Philadelphia Inquirer), “scary and brilliant” (Toronto Globe and Mail) and “polished, riveting prose” (Chicago Tribune). Publishers Weekly has dubbed her the “medical suspense queen.”

Her series of novels featuring homicide detective Jane Rizzoli and medical examiner Maura Isles inspired the TNT television series Rizzoli & Isles starring Angie Harmon and Sasha Alexander.

Now retired from medicine, Gerritsen writes full time from her home in Camden, Maine.

David Mallett of Sebec, Maine, has had a music career spanning four decades. His songs, which take place in or are written about experiences of Maine have been recorded by more than 150 artists, including Pete Seeger, Alison Krauss, John Denver, Emmylou Harris and even the Muppets. His Garden Song has become an American folk classic. He has performed in town halls and folk clubs across America and Europe, in addition to major venues, such as Barns of Wolf Trap, Newport Folk Festival and Prairie Home Companion.

The Bangor Daily News recognized him as one of the 58 most memorable Mainers of the 20th century, along with Marshall Dodge, Andrew Wyeth, E.B. White, Stephen King and Edna St. Vincent Millay. He has recorded 15 albums, including The Fable True (2007), based on Thoreau’s expeditions in the Maine Woods, a spoken word CD with accompanying music.

Mallett began his musical career in Bangor at age 11, performing in a country-folk duo with his older brother Neil. He began writing songs when he was a theater student at the University of Maine. After living in Nashville for many years, Mallett returned to Maine in 1995 and established his own label, North Road Records. He continues to travel and perform on the world stage. His sons, Luke and Will, founded the six-member alt-country/rock Mallett Brothers Band in Portland, Maine.

Contact: Margaret Nagle, 207.581.3745

Categories: Combined News, News

27th Annual Graduate Student and Faculty Recognition (Hooding) Ceremony Information Available

Grad School NEWS - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 16:06

The 27th Annual Graduate Student and Faculty Recognition (Hooding) Ceremony will be held on Friday, May 9th, 2014 from 4 to 6 pm at the Alfond Arena.  A reception in Wells Conference Center will immediately follow.  For more information please see the appropriate link below, or contact the Graduate School at umhooding@maine.edu or 207.581.3291. 

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Categories: Combined News, News

UMaine is Buying Out a Year of Head Coach Ted Woodward’s Contract

University of Maine News - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 15:30

University of Maine President Paul Ferguson has announced that the university is buying out the contract of men’s basketball head coach Ted Woodward, ending his tenure as coach effective April 14, 2014. The decision was reached after evaluation of the program by Director of Athletics Karlton Creech and university administration.

“I would like to thank Ted for his 18 years of service to the University of Maine, first as an assistant coach and then a head coach,” said Creech. “Ted’s commitment to the University of Maine and its student-athletes — both athletically and academically — have been the trademark of his tenure here.”

Woodward had two years remaining on his contract extension. He will be paid a 13-month buyout of approximately $113,800 related to one year’s salary. UMaine will use only privately raised funds from the President’s Discretionary Account to meet that obligation. No funds will be reallocated from the current university budget committed to academic programs, or faculty, student or operational needs.

A formal national search for Woodward’s replacement will begin immediately.

Woodward recently finished his 10th season as head coach of the Black Bears, compiling a record of 117–178 with the program.

Woodward came to the University of Maine in 1996 as the top assistant and recruiting coordinator for then head coach John Giannini. He also served as an assistant coach at Central Connecticut State University and Harvard University, after beginning his career as a graduate assistant at the University of Connecticut. Woodward also coached golf at the University of Maine from 1997–2001.

Categories: Combined News, News

STEM/SBS Women Career Awards and Panel Discussion

Grad School NEWS - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 13:26
Please join us as we recognize the career achievements of three amazing UMaine women faculty and discuss how the challenges and opportunities for women pursuing of careers in the STEM and Social and Behavior Sciences has changed and how they have stayed the same over the past few decades!

See attached flyer!

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Categories: Combined News, News

GradExpo 2014 Winners

Grad School NEWS - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 13:22

The Graduate Student Government and Graduate School are pleased to announce the award recipients for the following awards: 

President’s Research Impact Award: Spencer Meyer

Innovation Award: Spencer Meyer

Provost Teaching Award

1st Place:  Rebecca White

2nd Place: John Bell

3rd Place: Matthew McEntee
 

Mentoring Award

1st Place: Brittany Cline

2nd Place: Agnes Taylor

3rd Place: Kara Lorion

 

Grad Videography Award:

Hari Prasath Palani

 

Grad Photography Awards

Graduate Student Life Category

1st Place: Eva Manandhar

2nd Place: Brett Lerner

3rd Place: Corey Cole

Graduate Student Research Category

1st Place: Amy Pierce

2nd Place: Timothy Godaire

3rd Place: Robin Arnold

 

PechaKucha

1st Place: Theodore Wilhite

2nd Place: Amy Pierce

3rd Place: John Bell

 

Intermedia

1st Place: Julie Riley

2nd Place: Amy Pierce

3rd Place: Jessica LeClair

 

Oral

Arts & Humanities

1st Place: Rebecca White

2nd Place: Nataliya Shpylova-Saeed

3rd Place: Ian Jesse

 

Natural Sciences

1st Place: Brianna Hughes

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Categories: Combined News, News

UMaine, Ward to be Featured in ‘State of the State’ TV Program

University of Maine News - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 11:51

Jake Ward, the University of Maine’s vice president for innovation and economic development, will be featured on an upcoming episode of the Maine Center for Economic Policy’s television show, “State of the State.” The weekly talk show focuses on Maine issues and is hosted by MECEP staff. The new episode will focus on research and development and will look at the university’s role in the growth of two Maine companies — Acadia Harvest and Kenway Corp. The episode will air on Time Warner Cable’s Channel 9 at 10 a.m., 2 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Thursday, April 17 and Thursday, April 24. A podcast of the full program also will be available on MECEP’s website. More information about the upcoming show can be found on the MECEP blog.

Categories: Combined News, News

Media Cover World Languages Day at UMaine

University of Maine News - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 11:44

WABI (Channel 5) and WVII (Channel 7) reported on the University of Maine’s celebration of World Languages Day. More than 100 area high school students attended the event that highlighted French and Spanish with  traditional dance lessons, a campuswide scavenger hunt and a culture bowl competition. Danielle Beaupre, a lecturer in UMaine’s Department of Modern Languages and Classics, said the best way to learn a language is through immersion. “Getting to spend a whole day in the target language that they’re studying has been a great experience for them,” Beaupre said of the students. The UMaine Department of Modern Languages and Classics, The Canadian-American Center and the Foreign Language Association of Maine (FLAME) sponsored the event.

Categories: Combined News, News

WABI Reports on Maine National History Day Competition at UMaine

University of Maine News - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 11:43

WABI (Channel 5) covered the Maine National History Day competition held at the University of Maine. More than 300 students, teachers and chaperones from about 20 Maine middle and high schools gathered at the event to show off their exhibits, websites, documentaries and performances. National History Day (NHD) is an academic program that promotes critical thinking, research and presentation skills through project-based learning for students of all abilities. Students’ projects were judged, and the top two winners in each category became eligible to compete in the national contest in Washington, D.C. in June. A scavenger hunt with activities from a half dozen museums and history organizations, including a Civil War re-enactment group, also were offered to students.

Categories: Combined News, News

Slate Quotes UMaine Doctoral Student in Article on Stephen Colbert

University of Maine News - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 11:43

University of Maine doctoral student Skylar Bayer, aka “The Lonely Lady Scientist” among fans of “The Colbert Report,” was quoted in a Slate article titled, “Stephen Colbert is the Best Source of Science on TV.” Article author David Shiffman, a University of Miami doctoral student, said he hoped Colbert would continue to showcase scientists when he succeeds David Letterman as host of “The Late Show.” Bayer told Shiffman that Colbert’s method of using humor and sarcasm to explain science is effective. After she played the Colbert segment in which she appeared to high school students, she asked them for their impressions. “I asked them what they thought about scientists afterwards. They said I seemed pretty normal,” she said. “I asked them if they learned anything about scallop reproduction. They said they got that it was important to the fishery. Getting some high-schoolers to get those two pieces of information out of a TV segment while laughing hysterically is a huge accomplishment.”

Categories: Combined News, News

UMaine Volunteers Teach Children about Nanotechnology, WABI Reports

University of Maine News - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 11:42

WABI (Channel 5) reported volunteers from the University of Maine helped children celebrate NanoDays at the Maine Discovery Museum in downtown Bangor. The museum set up hands-on activities to help children understand small particles. Trudi Plummer, the museum’s education director, said there is a lot of nanoscience research happening at the the University of Maine, and the displays show children what can be done using nanoscience technology.

Categories: Combined News, News

McCleave Talks to Press Herald About Eels

University of Maine News - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 11:41

James McCleave, a University of Maine professor emeritus of marine sciences and a leading expert on eels, spoke with the Portland Press Herald for an article about Maine’s elver industry. McCleave, who has spent the last 40 years studying eels, said he has seen eels go from being considered a food source for humans, to fish bait, and now an expensive export while in their early stages as elvers. McCleave also spoke about the “muddy” flavor of wild eels. He said the eels’ natural fattiness makes it easy for them to retain toxins. “Eels in the wild that are 10 years old have been out there collecting nasties for 10 years,” he said.

Categories: Combined News, News

UMaine Research Cited in Press Herald Article on Arsenic in Well Water

University of Maine News - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 11:40

Data from a 2006 University of Maine study was cited in a Portland Press Herald article titled, “Maine residents seek state help on arsenic in well water.” The article states about 40 percent of Mainers use private water wells, and according to the UMaine research, a quarter of those wells have arsenic concentrations more than 10 parts per billion — the federal legal standard for public drinking water.

Categories: Combined News, News

WABI Attends Bike Swap at UMaine

University of Maine News - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 11:39

WABI (Channel 5) covered the Bicycle Coalition of Maine’s 14th annual Great Maine Bike Swap that was held at the University of Maine’s New Balance Student Recreation Center. More than 400 bikes, including road bikes, mountain bikes and unicycles, were on sale at the event.

Categories: Combined News, News

EMMC Announces Inaugural Chair of UMaine External Advisory Board

University of Maine News - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 11:39

Ian Dickey, MD, FRCSC, lead physician of Eastern Maine Medical Center’s orthopedic surgical specialists, has been invited to serve as the first chair of the University of Maine Graduate School of Biomedical Science and Engineering’s new external advisory board, EMMC announced.

UMaine established the school in 2006 as a collaborative effort between the university, The Jackson Laboratory, Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory, Maine Medical Center Research Institute, University of Southern Maine and University of New England. About 40 Ph.D. students and 100 faculty members are currently involved with the school, researching molecular and cellular biology, neuroscience, biomedical engineering, toxicology and functional genomics.

“To move to the next stage, the program needs the advice of a high-powered, knowledgeable external advisory board,” said David Neivandt, director of the UMaine Graduate School of Biomedical Science and Engineering. “This board, with Dr. Dickey’s leadership, will provide external counsel and perspective regarding scientific direction and curricula, assist in identifying and securing external funding, aid in networking for students and faculty, and serve as an advocacy role both internal and external to the university.”

The full EMMC news release is online.

Categories: Combined News, News

UMaine Alum Kurt Rademaker Wins International Award for Ice-Age Research

Grad School NEWS - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 09:58

Posted April 14, 2014

Dr. Kurt Rademaker, 2012 doctoral graduate from the University of Maine and faculty associate of both the Department of Anthropology and the Climate Change Institute, recently received the 16th Tubingen Research Prize in Early Prehistory and Quaternary Ecology. The award is offered by the Eberhard Karls University in Tubingen, Germany and was created to foster innovative research among young scholars studying Ice Age archaeology, Quaternary ecology and human evolution. As the 2014 recipient, Rademaker delivered the prize lecture February 6th in Germany, received 5,000 Euros, and is expected to contribute a research paper summarizing his research for the journal Mitteilungen der Gesellschaft für Urgeschichte.

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Jocelyn Runnebaum, Marine Sciences Graduate Student, Receives Major Grant

Grad School NEWS - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 09:16

Posted April 14, 2014

School of Marine Sciences graduate student Jocelyn Runnebaum helped develop and write the recently funded project for studying Atlantic cod and cusk bycatch in the lobster fishery, which potentially has significant impacts on the management of the Maine lobster fishery. Runnebaum is in the dual MS program in Marine Policy and Marine Biology. The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant grant was awarded through NOAA for a two year project. Specifically this research aims to assess if Atlantic cod and cusk can survive physical trauma that is induced when brought to the surface in a lobster trap if a treatment is applied in a timely manner. Jocelyn will be working with Dr. Chen to play a critical role in the three components of the research; modeling, fieldwork, and outreach. This is a cooperative research endeavor that utilizes opportunistic sampling methods by researchers accompanying commercial lobster harvesters on regular fishing trips to collect data about Atlantic cod and cusk. Jocelyn has identified fisherman participants and has already been working with them to collect data on cusk; she will continue conducting research on cusk and a future graduate student will focus their research on Atlantic cod.

Categories: Combined News, News

The Higher Degree 2014 Issue Available

Grad School NEWS - Fri, 04/11/2014 - 11:09

The 2014 Graduate School Newsletter, The Higher Degree is available.  Check out the features, including information about the first Graduate School Dean, George Davis Chase.  

Categories: Combined News, News

Hallman, Cox Featured in BDN Article

University of Maine News - Fri, 04/11/2014 - 10:29

The Bangor Daily News reported two music professors at the University of Maine — Ludlow Hallman and Dennis Cox — will retire at the end of the semester, and the upcoming Bangor Symphony Orchestra concert will be their last time working with the UMaine vocal groups they’ve led for decades. Hallman has conducted the Oratorio Society since he began teaching at UMaine in 1970, and Cox has led the University Singers for more than 30 years. Hallman said the two have been through a lot together and have become “very good friends.” Both men spoke highly of UMaine’s music program, facilities and students. “We have great students right now, and I mean that sincerely,” said Cox. “It’s always about the students. It’s always the most rewarding part of any day,” added Hallman.

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