News

Fundraiser Led by Art Education Students, Shaw House Mentioned in Weekly Article

University of Maine News - Mon, 08/18/2014 - 11:10

An art-making and fundraising project that was facilitated by University of Maine students in an advanced art education course was mentioned in a Weekly article about music becoming an important part of the lives of Shaw House residents. The first three instruments at Bangor’s Shaw House, an organization that works with youth who are homeless or are at risk of becoming homeless, were purchased with money raised through the sale of ceramic and found-object pins created by house residents under the instruction of Constant Albertson, an associate professor of art education, and students in her class.

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WLBZ Interviews Rice About Old Town Mill Closure

University of Maine News - Mon, 08/18/2014 - 11:08

WLBZ (Channel 2) spoke with Robert Rice, a professor of wood science and technology at the University of Maine, for a report on mill officials remaining optimistic about Old Town Fuel and Fiber’s future despite the recent shutdown of the mill. Rice said if mill owners choose to sell, they should consider options, including whether the new owner will continue researching biofuels. He added one of the major challenges the mill faced was that it produced only market pulp, an operational structure that is becoming less viable in the United States.

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BDN Reports on UMaine Testing of Materials for Possible Mars Mission

University of Maine News - Mon, 08/18/2014 - 11:07

The Bangor Daily News reported engineers with University of Maine’s Advanced Structures and Composites Center are working with NASA to perfect the Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD). The HIAD is a spacecraft nose-mounted “giant cone of inner tubes” stacked like a ring toy that slows a spacecraft as it enters a planet’s atmosphere. The HIAD could make it possible for a spaceship large enough to carry astronauts and heavy loads of scientific equipment to explore Mars and beyond. “There aren’t that many people in the U.S., or around the world, working on these sorts of things,” said Bill Davids, chair of the civil and environmental engineering department and the John C. Bridge Professor at UMaine who is working on the project. “It really helps support education as well,” he added.

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Fried, Brewer Quoted in Sun Journal Analysis on Social Messaging in Maine’s Politics

University of Maine News - Mon, 08/18/2014 - 11:06

University of Maine political science professors Amy Fried and Mark Brewer were quoted in a Sun Journal political analysis on social media use in Maine campaigns. Fried spoke about anonymous commenters who use hate speech online, saying “Not giving their names gives them a perch from which to lob uncivil comments, to present themselves as multiple individuals, and to avoid accountability for themselves and the parties and candidates for whom they may speak.” Brewer said campaigns should consider adopting stringent social media policies, including some pre-screening rules for people affiliated with a campaign. The Bangor Daily News carried the Sun Journal report.

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Memorial Held for Longtime UMaine Baseball Coach Winkin, Media Report

University of Maine News - Mon, 08/18/2014 - 11:04

The Portland Press Herald, WLBZ (Channel 2) and WABI (Channel 5) reported former players, coaches and community members joined family and friends to remember longtime college baseball coach John Winkin who passed away July 19. Attendees of the memorial at Colby College in Waterville shared stories for two and a half hours, the Press Herald reported. For more than 50 years, Winkin coached college baseball in Maine, first at Colby, then at the University of Maine, and at Husson University. Winkin led the Black Bears for 22 seasons, compiled a 642–430–3 record with the team, and helped the squad reach the College World Series six times, according to previously published reports.

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Bear Necessities Tent Sale Aug. 27–30

University of Maine News - Mon, 08/18/2014 - 11:01

The annual Bear Necessities and Athletic Equipment Room Tent Sale will be Wednesday, Aug. 27 through Saturday, Aug. 30 in the Alfond Arena parking lot and in the University of Maine Athletics Department store. The sale will run from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, and from noon to 9 p.m. Saturday. Deals on Black Bear merchandise will be featured. Prices start at $5.95 for T-shirts, $10 shorts, $19.95 sweatshirts and $20 jackets.

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Grant to Boost Nurses who Provide Care to Rural Mainers, BDN Reports

University of Maine News - Fri, 08/15/2014 - 09:30

The Bangor Daily News reported on an Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship grant that was awarded to the University of Maine School of Nursing to defray educational costs of family nurse practitioner (FNP) students who will provide primary health care for rural Mainers in medically underserved areas. The nearly $600,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, will aid eligible, full-time FNP students in the School of Nursing master’s degree program in 2014 and 2015. “The goal of the funding is they want more care providers in underserved areas as soon as possible,” said Nancy Fishwick, director of UMaine’s School of Nursing.

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BDN Previews Collins Center for the Arts Season

University of Maine News - Fri, 08/15/2014 - 09:29

The Bangor Daily News published an article about the Collins Center for the Art’s 2014–15 season. Danny Williams, executive director of the CCA, told the BDN his goal is to offer the most varied season possible through world-class dance, theater, classical music and a new partnership with Waterfront Concerts. “We want to offer something for everybody, which includes our roots, of course, along with new audiences. Diversity is the key,” Williams said.

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UFC Fighters Visit UMaine Football Players, Media Report

University of Maine News - Fri, 08/15/2014 - 09:28

WLBZ (Channel 2) and the Bangor Daily News reported UFC fighters and former college football players, Shawn Jordan and Ovince St. Preux, attended a University of Maine football team practice. The men stopped by to offer advice and talk about their college football careers and experiences.

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Startup Weekend to be Held in Bangor, on Campus

University of Maine News - Fri, 08/15/2014 - 09:27

Bangor’s first Startup Weekend will be Sept. 19–21, focused on jump-starting companies and networking entrepreneurs.

Startup Weekend Bangor will be held Sept. 19 at Bagel Central, 33 Central St., Bangor, and Sept. 20–21 at the University of Maine’s Foster Center for Student Innovation and the Innovative Media Research and Commercialization (IMRC) Center. Registration is $99 per person ($75 through Sept. 5); $25 for students. Registration and more information is online.

The hands-on, immersive event is part of Startup Weekend Maine, which brings designers, developers and entrepreneurs together to pitch their startup ideas and receive peer feedback. Teams form around the top ideas — determined by popular vote — and spend the remainder of the three days building a business model. Final presentations before local entrepreneurial leaders culminate the weekend.

Startup Weekend Portland was held June 13; Startup Weekend Auburn is Nov. 14. The events take their mission from the global grassroots effort Startup Weekends that helps community volunteers organize the 54-hour events to share ideas, form teams, build products and launch startups, according to its website.

The community organizers of Startup Weekend Bangor include Jesse Moriarity and Jennifer Hooper of the Foster Center for Student Innovation; Chuck Carter of Eagre Interactive; Gerry Hall of Emera Maine; UMaine students Silvia Guzman and Michael Kennedy; and Erika Allison, winner of Startup Weekend Portland.

UMaine is a Blackstone Accelerates Growth (BxG) partner and Bangor is one of three regional BxG Innovation Hubs.

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Littlefield Garden Closed Monday–Tuesday

University of Maine News - Thu, 08/14/2014 - 15:02

UMaine’s Littlefield Ornamentals Trial Garden on Rangeley Road will be closed Monday–Tuesday, Aug. 18–19, for maintenance.

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CCAR Outreach Efforts Featured in Aquaculture North America Article

University of Maine News - Thu, 08/14/2014 - 10:00

The University of Maine’s Center for Cooperative Aquaculture (CCAR) in Franklin was mentioned in an Aquaculture North America article about Acadia Harvest Inc. of Brunswick, Maine, reaching the final pilot phase of its work on land-based re-circ aquaculture of California yellowtail. The company also is laying the groundwork for commercial production of yellowtail, and hopes to add black sea bass in the future, the article states. Taylor Pryor, a chief scientist and marine biologist at Acadia Harvest Inc., said the company wouldn’t have accomplished as much in the past three years without the expertise at CCAR, which supports aquaculture business incubation. “The CCAR staff are wonderfully competent in their hatchery work,” Pryor said. “Having their expertise and the CCAR facility can vastly reduce the time needed to move projects forward.”

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Reuters Interviews Brewer for Report on Campaign Finance Law Challenge

University of Maine News - Thu, 08/14/2014 - 09:59

Reuters interviewed Mark Brewer, a political science professor at the University of Maine, for the article “Maine campaign finance law challenged as unfair to independents.” Independent gubernatorial candidate Eliot Cutler recently filed a suit in U.S. District Court in Portland that claims the state’s campaign finance law violates First and 14th Amendment rights to free speech, equal protection and political expression by allowing individuals to donate twice as much to major-party candidates as to independents. “We’ve had the two major parties writing our campaign laws, and they’ve really stacked the deck in their favor, making it difficult for third parties to compete. This could change things,” Brewer said. The Courant and Yahoo News carried the Reuters report.

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Trostel Quoted in BDN Article on Community College Enrollment

University of Maine News - Thu, 08/14/2014 - 09:54

The Bangor Daily News spoke with University of Maine economist Philip Trostel for an article about enrollment at community colleges. Trostel said it’s common during difficult economic times for community college enrollments to increase. “Going to college is expensive, especially when going means you have to take off time from work,” he said. He said when it’s hard to find a job, some people see an opportunity to go to school, and they’re likely to look for an affordable option.

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Fall ’14 Go Blue Fridays

University of Maine News - Thu, 08/14/2014 - 09:54

The following days have been designated as Go Blue Fridays, a chance to show your UMaine spirit and campus pride by wearing blue and/or UMaine clothing: Aug. 29; Sept. 19; Oct. 3 and 17; and Nov. 7 and 21.

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USDA Grant Funds Study of Caliciopsis Canker in White Pine

University of Maine News - Thu, 08/14/2014 - 08:26

William Livingston, School of Forest Resources, has received a more than $77,700 U.S. Department of Agriculture grant to study Caliciopsis in white pine. Many white pine stands in southern Maine and New Hampshire have suffered from declines and diebacks in the past 15 years. A fungal disease, Caliciopsis canker, has been frequently observed in these stands. Typically, the white pines stands suffering from Caliciopsis canker are those that are very dense, and foresters recommend that the stands should be thinned to improve tree growth. However, it is uncertain if stands infected with Caliciopsis canker will respond to stand thinning and improve growth; the uncut trees may not recover from the disease. The objectives for the study are to identify areas at greatest risk of Caliciopsis canker damage, assess effects of thinning in stands affected by Caliciopsis canker and develop management guidelines for reducing damage related to Caliciopsis canker.

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Seeing Forests Through The Trees

University of Maine News - Wed, 08/13/2014 - 15:03

Since 1800 — two decades before the Pine Tree state existed as a state — the most rapid rate of land protection in northern New England (NNE) occurred from 1999 to 2010.

Forty-four percent of all the protected area (PA) in Maine, Vermont and New Hampshire was added during those 11 years, says Spencer Meyer, former associate scientist for forest stewardship with the University of Maine Center for Research on Sustainable Forests.

Conservation easements on privately owned land fueled an abrupt increase in the protection rate from 1999 to 2010, he says. Conservation easements became financially appealing to both landowners and conservationists who partnered to save landscapes from development to ensure forests and ecosystem services — including water purification — remained intact.

For example, in 2001, the Pingree Forest Partnership — a landmark working forest conservation project — was forged. The 762,192 protected acres is bigger than all of Rhode Island and is still the largest of its kind in the nation.

The 11-year span from 1999 to 2010 was one of three distinct eras of PA growth, says Meyer, who earned his Ph.D. at UMaine in 2014. The other two were 1800–1979 and 1980–1999. All, he says, are characterized by new policies and an expansion of conservation tools.

To inform successful future conservation planning, a research team led by Meyer sought to explore socioeconomic and policy factors that influenced the rate, type and distribution of previous land protection.

“It is important to take pause occasionally and revisit our past,” he says. “This conservation history research was especially rewarding because it gave us a chance to examine how much has already been accomplished by conservationists. The frequent innovation and accelerating protection we have documented bodes well for the future of ecosystems and people in the region.”

Researchers found there has been a “significant influence of expanded policy and economic drivers guiding protection” and that it is important to develop “new conservation innovations for achieving future gains in protection.”

Short-term constraints — including real estate market conditions — impact conservation action, says Meyer, now a NatureNet Fellow at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, where he collaborates with The Nature Conservancy.

Thus, the team recommends that conservation groups focus on priority areas and take a proactive, rather than reactive, approach to protection, and be ready to capitalize on financial market conditions that make large conservation deals attractive to landowners.

Much of NNE is privately owned, Meyer reports; 16 percent of New Hampshire is federally or state owned, while eight percent of Vermont and five percent of Maine are. All three states are heavily forested. Maine has 84 percent forest cover, while Vermont and New Hampshire both have 67 percent.

A group of conservation scientists, led by the Harvard Forest, have proposed protecting 70 percent of New England’s forests from development to achieve a sustainable landscape by 2060. If the protection rate realized from 1999 to 2010 continues, Meyer says the 70-percent goal could be achieved in 2089.

Broad objectives of PAs in NNE include conservation of biodiversity, retaining benefits of ecosystems, public open space, recreation, and natural resource removal, such as timber harvesting, he says.

Tension exists due to people’s increasing demand to use land and the need to conserve land and ecosystem services, and land protection has been a global conservation strategy of a number of public and private groups for more than 100 years, Meyer says.

Land protection from 1800 to 1979 had an “evolving suite of conservation objectives,” he says, including watershed protection, open space and recreation. The 179-year era consisted of slow, incremental expansion of PAs, including (Acadia National Park, the Appalachian Trail and Baxter State Park) and multiple-use forests.

The middle era of conservation of PAs — beginning around 1980 and lasting until 1999 — included a surge in land trusts to protect private land from development. Public acquisitions, continued in a linear fashion during that time, according to researchers.

The rate of protection in NNE between 1999–2010 was four times what it was during the 19-year span from 1980 to 1999 and 20 times the rate between 1800 and 1979, says Meyer. During the span from 1999 to 2010, the accelerating rate of protection was the fastest in Maine, where 71 percent of the state’s total PA was safeguarded from development.

“Regardless of what the future holds, the 200-year history of conservation innovation in New England offers hope for future efforts to protect ecosystems and their myriad ecological, social and economic benefits in the face of rising human populations,” the team writes.

The Maine Sustainability Solutions Initiative (SSI) and the National Science Foundation EPSCoR program supported Meyer’s Ph.D. fellowship in UMaine’s School of Forest Resources.

Researchers from UMaine working with Meyer included Christopher Cronan of the School of Biology and Ecology, Robert Lilieholm of the School of Forest Resources and Michelle Johnson of the Ecology and Environmental Science Program, as well as David Foster of Harvard University.

The team’s findings are reported in “Land conservation in northern New England: Historic trends and alternative conservation futures,” published in May on the Biological Conservation website.

Meyer and another team earned the 2014 University of Maine President’s Research Impact Award for spearheading creation of the Maine Futures Community Mapper — an online mapping tool for planners to visualize future landscape scenarios. The Elmina B. Sewall Foundation and SSI funded the Maine Futures Community Mapper.

Contact: Beth Staples, 207.581.3777

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Brewer Quoted in BDN Article on Chris Christie’s Maine Visit to Support LePage

University of Maine News - Wed, 08/13/2014 - 11:45

Mark Brewer, a political science professor at the University of Maine, was quoted in a Bangor Daily News article about New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie’s most recent visit to Maine to show support for Gov. Paul LePage and his re-election campaign. “Christie is about as big as it gets right now for a Republican fundraiser. He’s certainly an A-lister,” Brewer said.

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Foster Center’s Innovation Efforts Praised in SeacoastOnline Op-Ed

University of Maine News - Wed, 08/13/2014 - 11:44

The Foster Center for Student Innovation at the University of Maine was mentioned in a SeacoastOnline opinion piece titled “Innovators key to Maine’s economy,” by Rep. Deane Rykerson. “The collective efforts of the Foster Center at the University of Maine, the Maine Center for Entrepreneurship, the Maine Center for Creativity, Maine Technology Institute, Envision Maine, Accelerate Maine and others are building a base of innovators and entrepreneurs, and establishing a Maine brand as the place to be if you want to innovate,” the article states.

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Local Bread Wheat Project Cited in Press Herald Report

University of Maine News - Wed, 08/13/2014 - 11:42

A Portland Press Herald article about Maine bakeries using more local grains mentioned the Northern New England Local Bread Wheat Project, a USDA-funded collaboration of researchers, farmers, millers and bakers in Vermont and Maine that aims to help farmers increase organic bread wheat production and quality. For the past four years, Alison Pray, co-owner of the Standard Baking Co. in Portland, has been working with the Northern New England Local Bread Wheat Project at the University of Maine and the Northern Grain Growers Association. The groups occasionally send her new heritage wheat varieties to bake with so she can evaluate their properties and flavor, according to the article.

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