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News from the University of Maine
Updated: 9 hours 42 min ago

Dill Quoted in Press Herald Article About Increase in Tick-Borne Illnesses

Tue, 08/12/2014 - 09:34

James Dill, a pest management specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, was quoted in a Portland Press Herald article about Maine seeing an increase in tick-bite illnesses other than Lyme disease. Cases of anaplasmosis and babesiosis, which can seriously affect health if undetected, are at or nearing record levels in the state, according to the article. Dill said the good thing about illnesses from ticks is they can be treated with antibiotics. “That’s why, when we have a tick bite, we always tell the individual to contact their physician, especially if people find a tick that is attached and it has started to feed,” he said. He also stressed the importance of having a dedicated tick laboratory at UMaine, which would be funded if voters support Question 2 on the November ballot.

Categories: Combined News, News

Erb, Ward Named to Maine Technology Institute’s Executive Committee, BDN Reports

Tue, 08/12/2014 - 09:33

David Erb, senior R&D program manager at the University of Maine’s Advanced Structures and Composites Center, and Jake Ward, UMaine’s vice president for innovation and economic development, were selected as members of the Maine Technology Institute’s executive committee by the institute’s board, according to a Bangor Daily News article about MTI’s interim leader. The executive committee will advise Brian Whitney, director of business development and innovation for the Maine Department of Economic and Community Development, as he takes over as the acting director of MTI, the article states. The executive committee also will review applicants for the permanent post as president of MTI.

Categories: Combined News, News

Dill Quoted in AP Article on Berry Growers’ Fruit Fly Battles

Mon, 08/11/2014 - 10:27

James Dill, a pest management specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, was quoted in an Associated Press article about Northeast berry growers learning how to combat an invasive fruit fly — the tiny spotted-wing drosophila — that wiped out 80 percent of some farms’ late-season fruit two years ago. Growers in Maine, the country’s largest producer of wild blueberries, are spraying and harvesting sooner and planting earlier varieties, the article states. “You take a loss, but the loss is on green berries rather than having to put more pesticides out there,” Dill said. The Portland Press Herald, Yahoo! News and Fox Business carried the AP report.

Categories: Combined News, News

UMaine Mentioned in Boston Globe Report on Newton Startup

Mon, 08/11/2014 - 10:25

Technology developed at the University of Maine was mentioned in a Boston Globe article about UltraCell Insulation, a Newton, Massachusetts startup that aims to recycle cardboard boxes into cellulose insulation for homes. The company’s technology was developed and tested at UMaine, where researchers came up with a process of separating contaminants from cardboard and adding a proprietary mix of borate chemicals to make the material fire retardant, the article states. The university owns the technology patent jointly with UltraCell.

Categories: Combined News, News

WABI Covers Mitchell Institute Scholars Brunch at UMaine

Mon, 08/11/2014 - 10:23

WABI (Channel 5) reported on a brunch held at the University of Maine to honor more than 100 senior high school students from every Maine public school who were awarded a scholarship by Sen. George Mitchell. The program, which was started by Sen. Mitchell, aims to expand opportunities for students and help them succeed, according to the report. “He started this out of his own background where he understood how important it was to have somebody give you a scholarship, mentor you, support you and guide you through the four years of college,” said Meg Baxter, president of the Mitchell Institute.

Categories: Combined News, News

UMaine Honeybee Research Cited in Huffington Post Article

Mon, 08/11/2014 - 10:22

Research being conducted at the University of Maine was mentioned in a Huffington Post article titled, “Who grows our food: Wild blueberries, honeybees and Wyman’s of Maine.” According to the article, Wyman’s is funding honeybee preservation studies at UMaine and Pennsylvania State University because wild blueberries rely on honeybees for pollination, and the honeybee population is declining.

Categories: Combined News, News

WGME Interviews Dill About Tick that can Cause Food Allergy

Mon, 08/11/2014 - 10:22

WGME (Channel 13) spoke with James Dill, a pest management specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, for a report about studies that show a correlation between lone star tick bites and severe allergies to red meat. Dill said the lone star tick is not established yet in Maine. “We’ve had a few cases of it, most of them seem to appear to be people who have traveled out of state and have come back in,” he said, adding Mainers should still take precautions such as walking in the center of a trail, tucking pants into socks, wearing tick repellent and wearing light clothing so the ticks can be seen easily.

Categories: Combined News, News

Biddeford Company Proud of UMaine Grads it Hires as Engineers, Mainebiz Reports

Mon, 08/11/2014 - 10:19

David Loper, director of operations at Fiber Materials Inc. in Biddeford, told Mainebiz the company has a strong engineering department with a fairly large population of Maine-based professionals, including University of Maine graduates. “We’re trying to create an environment to grow engineering resources, and over the last 10 years we’ve done a good job to hold talent,” he said. The company also gives young engineers the opportunity to step into a leadership role earlier in their careers, according to the article.

Categories: Combined News, News

Trostel Featured in WalletHub Article on School Rankings

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 10:15

University of Maine economist Philip Trostel was cited in a WalletHub article that ranked school systems in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. School systems were ranked using 12 metrics — including student-teacher ratios, dropout rates, test scores and bullying incident rates. WalletHub found New Jersey, Massachusetts and Vermont, respectively, have the best school systems. Schools in Washington, D.C. were ranked last. Those in Mississippi and Alabama rounded out the bottom three. Maine tied for 17th with Illinois. Trostel said from a public finance perspective, tax exemptions for school items are bad public policy because they benefit nonpoor families more than poor families and come with a high public cost. “There are probably about $20 in tax benefits to nonpoor families for every $1 of tax benefits to poor children,” he said. “If we really want to help poor children with their education, we should take those $21 and use them for programs that directly help them, and just them.” Peers are the single most-important factor of a top school, he said. When it comes to student success, Trostel said both family and school are important, but in general, family matters more.

Categories: Combined News, News

Breece Quoted in Press Herald Article on Mainers’ Spending Habits

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 10:14

James Breece, an economics professor at the University of Maine, was interviewed by the Portland Press Herald for an article about a report recently released by the federal Bureau of Economic Analysis that found Mainers spent more than the national average on goods and services including gasoline, groceries and health care in 2012. Nationally, Maine ranked 13th in consumer spending and 32nd in median household income, according to the article. Being a relatively low-income state, the spending trends probably mean many Mainers are cutting back or forgoing savings, Breece said, adding “Mainers can’t afford to save money.” He also said many of the statistics make sense, including that Mainers spend more per capita on health care, most likely because of Maine’s higher population of older citizens.

Categories: Combined News, News

WABI Reports on Weight-Loss Program for Kids at Rec Center

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 10:13

WABI (Channel 5) spoke with participants in the Way to Optimal Weight, or WOW, program offered to children through a partnership between the University of Maine and Eastern Maine Medical Center. The program is designed to get children and their parents involved in building a healthier and more active lifestyle by offering instructional components on eating right and physical activities at the New Balance Student Recreation Center. Miles Gagnon, a UMaine student and physical trainer who works with WOW participants, told WABI he has seen improvement and more confidence among the children.

Categories: Combined News, News

Media Report on $20M Grant to Launch Sustainable Ecological Aquaculture Network in Maine

Thu, 08/07/2014 - 11:44

The Portland Press Herald, WABI (Channel 5), Maine Public Broadcasting Network, Bangor Daily News and Mainebiz reported a $20 million National Science Foundation EPSCoR grant will establish a Sustainable Ecological Aquaculture Network (SEANET) program in Maine. Maine EPSCoR at the University of Maine will use the grant to mobilize the collective capacity of Maine’s coastal science resources to establish SEANET, a research network focused on sustainable ecological aquaculture. The public-private partnership led by UMaine, in collaboration with the University of New England and other institutions, will use the state’s 3,500-mile coastline as a living laboratory to study physical oceanography, biophysical, biogeochemical, socioeconomic and policy interactions that have local, bioregional, national and global implications. Paul Anderson, director of SEANET at UMaine, told MPBN the grant offers a good opportunity to look at how aquaculture can be part of the seafood sector by working with the commercial fishing and tourism industries.

Categories: Combined News, News

Forest Bioproducts Research Institute Cited in Working Waterfront Article

Thu, 08/07/2014 - 11:43

The University of Maine’s Forest Bioproducts Research Institute (FBRI) was mentioned in a Working Waterfront article about wood chips that will be shipped from Eastport to Killybegs, Ireland. Phyto-Charter LLC will be in charge of exporting the wood chips after heat treating them as required by the European Union, the article states. The company will phytosanitize the chips on board the shipping vessel with a heat-treating system developed with FBRI. Phyto-Charter recently received certification for its system, the first such certification in the U.S. for the wood chip product, according to Chris Gardner, port director.

Categories: Combined News, News

4-H Camp to Offer Leadership Training for High School Students, Sun Journal Reports

Thu, 08/07/2014 - 11:42

The Sun Journal reported the University of Maine 4-H Camp and Learning Center at Bryant Pond is teaming up with Mahoosuc Pathways, an organization that promotes outdoor adventure and connects communities in the Mahoosuc Mountain range of western Maine and northeastern New Hampshire, to offer leadership training for 10 high school students. A Mahoosuc Pathways employee told the Sun Journal the two organizations are paying students to get leadership training by helping build trails on local public conservation lands in August. The project, called the Oxford County Conservation Corps, began two years ago, after Mahoosuc Pathways began looking for a way to get students involved in building and maintaining local trails.

Categories: Combined News, News

WABI Covers Vision Quest Program Offered at UMaine

Thu, 08/07/2014 - 11:41

WABI (Channel 5) reported on a five-week program sponsored by the Maine Department of Labor’s Division for the Blind and Visually Impaired and held at the University of Maine. Six students are taking part in the Vision Quest program on the Orono campus where they stay in dorms, attend class, eat in dining halls and participate in learning labs. The program aims to strengthen skills such as self-advocacy, test taking and time management, according to the report.

Categories: Combined News, News

Judd Quoted in New York Times Article on Millinocket

Wed, 08/06/2014 - 10:44

Richard Judd, a University of Maine history professor, was quoted in a New York Times article about Millinocket titled, “A paper mill goes quiet, and the community it built gropes for a way forward.” In the late 1970s and early ’80s, between 4,000 and 5,000 people were employed by Great Northern in the area, and Maine was among the leading papermaking states, according to the article. “I don’t think there’s any question that Millinocket, right through the ’70s, was one of America’s leading centers for paper production,” Judd said.

 

Categories: Combined News, News

Dill Gives Tips for Dealing with Garden Pests, Diseases on WVII ‘Backyard Gardener’ Segment

Wed, 08/06/2014 - 10:44

James Dill, a pest management specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, was featured in the latest installment of the “Backyard Gardener” series on WVII (Channel 7). Dill spoke about common garden pests and diseases such as beetles, woodchucks and late blight and offered advice on easy ways to prevent damage. For beetles, Dill suggests plucking them off plants and placing them in a cup of water with liquid soap detergent, or using traps. The ideal solution for dealing with larger wildlife such as woodchucks and groundhogs is to trap and release them, Dill says.

Categories: Combined News, News

Scientific American Interviews McCleave About Eels

Wed, 08/06/2014 - 10:43

Scientific American spoke with James McCleave, a University of Maine professor emeritus of marine sciences and a leading expert on eels, for the article “Glass eel gold rush casts Maine fishermen against scientists.” Maine fishermen have been catching glass eels, or elvers, and selling them at modest market prices for years, but demand from Asia has caused prices to skyrocket, according to the article. Some fisheries biologists are now worried about the eel’s survival because of a decline in population, the article states. “We’re supposed to manage fisheries on the precautionary principle. If the trend is down, we don’t say it’s OK,” McCleave said, adding eels were once abundant in East Coast freshwater ecosystems. He called eels a “keystone species,” and cautioned that if they are removed, many predator–prey relationships will fall apart. The Maine Public Broadcasting Network also cited the Scientific American article.

Categories: Combined News, News

Press Herald Advances UMaine Extension’s Backyard Locavore Day

Wed, 08/06/2014 - 10:42

The Portland Press Herald previewed the University of Maine Cooperative Extension’s sixth annual Backyard Locavore Day on Aug. 9. Several UMaine Extension experts will be on hand during self-guided tours of six backyards in Freeport and Brunswick. Visitors can learn do-it-yourself strategies for becoming a locavore, or a person who eats food locally grown and produced. Demonstrations and talk topics will include vegetable and square-foot gardening, backyard composting, greenhouses and beekeeping. Each garden session will feature food-preservation methods, including drying, hot water bath canning and making herbal vinegars and jam. Complimentary food samples will be provided.

Categories: Combined News, News

Learn to Cook for Crowds

Wed, 08/06/2014 - 10:41

University of Maine Cooperative Extension in Kennebec County will offer the Cooking for Crowds food safety training workshop twice in September on the third floor of the UMaine Extension Kennebec County office, 125 State St., Augusta.

Crystal Hamilton, nutrition and food systems professional, will instruct volunteer quantity cooks on methods for safely preparing, handling and serving food for large groups of people, including at soup kitchens, church functions, food pantries and community fundraisers. The workshops will be held 1–5 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 11 and Tuesday, Sept. 23. The workshop meets the Good Shepherd Food Bank food safety training requirements. Guideline topics include planning and purchasing, storing food supplies, preparing food, transporting, storing and serving cooked foods, and handling leftovers.

Cost is $15 per person; scholarships are available. Register online or call 207.622.7546. For more information, or to request a disability accommodation, call Diana Hartley at 207.622.7546 or 800.287.1481 (in Maine).

Categories: Combined News, News