Eight UMaine Graduate Students Present Research at the 2013 ACSUS Biennial Conference

Posted December 9, 2013

The University of Maine was well represented by eight graduate students at the 2013 Association for Canadian Studies in the United States Biennial Conference in Tampa, Florida November 19th through the 23rd. UMaine grad students presented six papers while four other students served on a panel for a round table discussion with two UMaine faculty. See the list below for participant contributions.

Papers presented:

Bad Men and Horrible Bosses: Masculinity and the Folksongs of Larry Gorman
Ian J. Jesse, Ph.D candidate, History Department

Freedom, Slavery, and the Evolving Understanding of Race British Abolition: A Nova
Scotian Narrative, 1825-1835

Gabriel Lévesque, Ph.D candidate, History Department

Two Brownstowns Two Nations: The “Faulty Memory” of a Few Small Skirmishes in North America
Joseph Miller, Ph.D candidate, History Department

The Rhetoric of Boundary Confrontation: Demagogues, Banditti, and the 'alarming state
of things' in New Brunswick, 1838-42.

Michael T. Perry, Ph.D candidate, History Department

The Evolution of Acadian Identity in Song
Elisa Sance, M.A. candidate, Department of Modern Languages and Classics

“You Are What You Eat”: Cookbooks and Women’s Identity, 1812-1860
Rachel A. Snell, Ph.D candidate, History Department

Round table panel:

"Canadian History at the University of Maine: New Thematic and Interdisciplinary
Approaches"

CHAIR/DISCUSSANT: Scott W. See, University of Maine
Joseph Miller, Ph.D candidate, History Department
Ann Morrisette, Ph.D candidate, History Department
Michael Perry, Ph.D candidate, History Department
• Dr. Stefano Tijerina, History Department
Rebecca White, PhD candidate, History Department