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Research > Clusters

Marine Climate Change

 

Arctic icemelt leads to leaner North Atlantic whales
Arctic icemelt leads to leaner North Atlantic whales

The oceans interact with climate drivers in manifold ways that range from obvious to subtle. This largest water bath stores heat and dampens temperature swings. Oceans also dissolve, store and cycle radiatively active gases such as carbon dioxide, thereby reducing their greenhouse effects. Dissolution of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the sea causes ocean acidification. The chain of chemical events driven by acidification makes carbontate, needed by many organisms to make shells and other support structures more difficult to obtain. The hydrogen ion then associates with a carbonate ion to form another bicarbonate ion, thereby making carbonate, needed to form shells and hard parts of organisms from microscopic phytoplankton to clams and lobsters, more difficult to obtain. The problem can be exacerbated by multiple stressors such as acidification, warming and metal shortage. Algae in the oceans take up carbon dioxide and use it to synthesize organic matter. Marine physical and biogeochemical processes determine whether the cells produced will decompose in surface waters and return to the atmosphere quickly as carbon dioxide, whether they will sink to deep waters and return carbon dioxide on time scales of ocean overturn or be buried for geological time (millions of years). Burial in marine sediments is the only major exit route for carbon from the active biosphere. SMS scientists also study how turbulence enchances phytoplankton nutrient uptake. Enhanced stratification from global warming is expected to decrease average turbulence intensities but to raise turbulence intensities locally and episodically in more violent weather events. If you are interested in the ways that climate change influences the ocean and in the ways that the ocean influences climate change, be sure to visit the interactive COSEE-OS website.

Participating Faculty

 

Fei Chai

Fei Chai

Bio sketch→
Interests: Biological-Physical Interactions, Fisheries Sciences, Ocean Modeling and Prediction, Marine Biogeochemistry, Biological Oceanography, Marine Climate Change
fchai@maine.edu
Phone: 207.581.4317

Annette DeCharon

Annette DeCharon

Bio sketch→
Interests: Education, Oceanography, Marine Policy, Marine Climate Change
Annette.decharon@maine.edu
Phone: 207.581-8176

Lewis Incze

Lewis Incze

Bio sketch→
Interests: larval ecology, physical-biological coupling, ecosystem modeling
lincze@maine.edu
Phone: 207.563.8192

Peter A. Jumars

Peter A. Jumars

Bio sketch→
Interests: Benthos, Benthic Oceanography, Biological-Physical Interactions, Bioacoustics, Biological-Physical Interactions, Ocean Observing Systems, Ocean Modeling and Prediction, Marine Invertebrate Zoology, Marine Climate Change
jumars@maine.edu
Phone: 207.581.5114

Lee Karp-Boss

Lee Karp-Boss

Bio sketch→
Interests: Biological-Physical Interactions, Phycology, Marine Physiological Ecology, Marine Optics, Biological Oceanography, Marine Climate Change
lee.karp-boss@maine.edu
Phone: 207.581.4305

Mary Jane Perry

Mary Jane Perry

Bio sketch→
Interests: Biological-Physical Interactions, Phycology, Ocean Observing Systems, Marine Physiological Ecology, Marine Biogeochemistry, Marine Optics, Biological Oceanography, Marine Climate Change
perrymj@maine.edu
Phone: 207.581.5339

Neal Pettigrew

Neal Pettigrew

Bio sketch→
Interests: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Ocean Energy, Marine Climate Change, Coastal Physical Oceanography, Ocean Observing Systems, Gulf of Maine, autonomous vehicles, data buoys, coastal currents, AUV, glider
nealp@maine.edu
Phone: 207.581.4384

Malcolm Shick

Malcolm Shick

Bio sketch→
Interests: Marine Physiological Ecology, Marine Invertebrate Zoology, Marine Biogeochemistry, Phycology, Marine Biology, Marine Climate Change
shick@maine.edu
Phone: (207) 581-2562

Robert Steneck

Robert Steneck

Bio sketch→
Interests: Marine Ecology, Benthic Oceanography, Marine Invertebrate Zoology, Marine Biology, Biological Oceanography, Marine Policy, Marine Climate Change, coral reefs, coastal marine ecosystems
steneck@maine.edu
Phone: (207) 581-5315

Andrew Thomas

Andrew Thomas

Bio sketch→
Interests: Ocean plankton patterns, Biological-physical interactions, Satellite oceanography, Digital image processing, Marine Climate Change
thomas@maine.edu
Phone: (207) 581-4335

David W. Townsend

David W. Townsend

Bio sketch→
Interests: Biological-Physical Interactions, Phytoplankton, Zooplankton, Nutrient Dynamics, Biological Oceanography, Marine Climate Change
davidt@maine.edu
Phone: (207) 581-4367

Rhian Waller

Rhian Waller

Bio sketch→
Interests: Marine Invertebrate Zoology; Benthic Oceanography; Marine Climate Change
rhian.waller@maine.edu
Phone: 207 563 8310

Mark Wells

Mark Wells

Bio sketch→
Interests: Phytoplankton Physiology, Trace Metals, Iron, Marine Biogeochemistry, Iron Limitation, CDOM, Sensors, Harmful Algal Blooms, Biological-Physical Interactions, Marine Aquaculture, Marine Optics, Marine Physiological Ecology, Ocean Observing Systems, Biological Oceanography, Marine Climate Change
mlwells@maine.edu
Phone: (207) 581-4322

Huijie Xue

Huijie Xue

Bio sketch→
Interests: Physical Oceanography, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Ocean Modeling and Prediction, Ocean Energy, Biological-Physical Interactions, Marine Climate Change
hxue@maine.edu
Phone: (207) 581-4318

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