Archive for the ‘Cooperative Extension’ Category

President Hunter Writes Op-Ed on Question 2 for BDN

Wednesday, October 29th, 2014

The Bangor Daily News published an opinion piece written by University of Maine President Susan Hunter, titled “‘Yes’ on Question 2 is a vote for Maine’s health, safety.” Question 2 on the November ballot will ask Maine voters to approve an $8 million bond for animal and plant diagnostic services. The bond would allow the University of Maine Cooperative Extension to build a new facility on campus to house labs for the monitoring and testing of insects and pests that affect domestic and wild plants and animals in Maine. “What’s needed in Maine is a facility devoted to pest management and animal health, where public health threats can be monitored through research and diagnostics,” Hunter wrote.

WVII Interviews Rebar About Importance of Building Biosecure Lab

Wednesday, October 29th, 2014

WVII (Channel 7) spoke with John Rebar, executive director of the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, about Question 2 on the November ballot that will ask Maine voters to approve an $8 million bond for animal and plant diagnostic services. UMaine Extension’s current facility was built in the 1940s and is not biosecure, according to the report. “Right now if you remove a tick from yourself, loved one, or a pet, we can identify the tick,” Rebar said. “There’s 14 different species in Maine of ticks, but we can’t tell you whether that tick contains microorganisms that will cause disease because we don’t have a biosecure lab in order to do that testing in.”

 

UMaine Extension Mentioned in The Guardian Article on Organic Food Startup

Monday, October 27th, 2014

The University of Maine Cooperative Extension was mentioned in an article published in The Guardian about Northern Girl, an Aroostook County company that processes the area’s surplus of organic crops. According to the article, one of the company’s founders said Northern Girl can now process about 1 million pounds of produce in the six to seven months following the August harvest. The company continues to work with UMaine Extension to learn the best way to store and preserve produce to enable year-round operations, the article states.

Turn Up the Heat Nov. 22 at 4-H Science Saturday

Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

Understanding how different materials react to high heat with sometimes surprising results is the focus of a hands-on University of Maine 4-H Science Saturday workshop Nov. 22 at UMaine’s Engineering Science Research Center, Barrows Hall.

Youth in grades six through eight will learn about technological uses of high-temperature materials by creating a piece of glass bead and wire jewelry to take home. Participants will also learn about research activities during the event from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at UMaine’s Laboratory for Surface Science and Technology.

The $15 fee includes lunch. Registration materials are available online. Maximum enrollment is 20; Nov. 14 is the deadline to register. For more information, or to request a disability accommodation, call Jessica Brainerd at 207.581.3877.

Working Waterfront Interviews Rebar, Lichtenwalner About Pest Lab Bond Proposal

Tuesday, October 21st, 2014

The Working Waterfront spoke with John Rebar, executive director of the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, and Anne Lichtenwalner, director of UMaine’s Animal Health Laboratory, about Question 2 on the November ballot that will ask Maine voters to approve an $8 million bond for animal and plant diagnostic services. The bond would allow UMaine Extension to build a new facility on campus to house labs for the monitoring and testing of insects and pests that affect domestic and wild plants and animals in Maine. “As a state with a large international border, thousands of miles of coastlines, and people and goods coming to Maine ports every day, the threat of disease and invasive species is increasing annually. This threat can destroy crops, kill or injure livestock and pose a threat to public health,” Rebar said, adding staff is “very limited” in what they can do in the current lab.

BDN Editorial Endorses Question 2, Stresses Importance of UMaine Extension Lab

Monday, October 20th, 2014

The Bangor Daily News published the editorial, “Yes on Question 2: Why it’s worth it to have a lab that tests ticks, moose and more,” about a bond that asks voters to support giving $8 million to the University of Maine Cooperative Extension to build a new animal and plant disease and insect control laboratory. “This $8 million bond is an investment in needed infrastructure at the University of Maine to better protect human health through insect-borne disease detection and food safety testing,” the article states.

McConnon Offers Advice to Nonprofits in Sun Journal Article

Monday, October 20th, 2014

James McConnon, a University of Maine economics professor and a business and economics specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, was quoted in the Sun Journal article, “More nonprofits, less money to go around.” According to McConnon, the number of nonprofits increased 25 percent across the country between 2001 and 2011, while the economy struggled. McConnon said he’s not surprised that some nonprofits are having difficulty getting grants or donations. “My own advice is to focus on what you have control over and what you do well, and be open to change,” he said. “Be flexible and nimble.”

Maine Hunger Dialogue Speaker Featured in BDN

Monday, October 20th, 2014

The Maine Hunger Dialogue, a two-day event held at the University of Maine that aims to mobilize the power of higher education to end hunger in the state, was mentioned in a Bangor Daily News article about one of the event’s speakers. Alex Justice Moore, a 2003 graduate of Bangor High School who works to help people out of homelessness at D.C. Central Kitchen in Washington, D.C., returned to Maine to talk about a new approach to solving hunger. Moore spoke at the Maine Hunger Dialogue in Orono and during an event hosted by Eastern Maine Development Corp. in Bangor. “Hunger isn’t about food,” Moore said. “Hunger is ultimately about poverty. We’re never going to feed our way out of hunger.”

UMaine Extension Launches ‘From Scratch: Your Maine Kitchen’ Series

Monday, October 20th, 2014

University of Maine Cooperative Extension’s yearlong monthly workshop series, “From Scratch: Your Maine Kitchen” kicks off from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 15, at the UMaine Extension Cumberland County office, 75 Clearwater Drive, Falmouth.

At the first workshop, “From the Maine Wild,” “Black Fly Stew” cookbook author Kate Gooding will discuss cooking wild game, including venison, moose and goose. She will prepare Burgundian Beaver Stew, which participants can sample for lunch. UMaine Extension Master Food Preserver Karyn Small will give tips on best food preservation practices for wild game.

Workshops scheduled through February include: “Gifts from the Maine Kitchen” with Kate McCarty, Dec. 6; “Making Sourdough Bread at Home” with Sheri Fistal, Jan. 17; and “Maine Seafood and Edible Seaweed,” Feb. 21.

The fee for the Nov. 15 workshop is $40 per person; proceeds benefit the UMaine Extension Nutrition Program in Cumberland County. Attendees will receive Cabela’s coupons and be entered to receive gift cards from Cabela’s. Registration is online. For more information, or to request a disability accommodation, contact 781.6099, 800.287.1471 (in Maine) or extension.rlreception@maine.edu.

Maine Hunger Dialogue Meal Packing Featured on WABI

Friday, October 17th, 2014

WABI (Channel 5) reported students and faculty from colleges across Maine are preparing 10,000 protein-packed meals to be donated to campus-based food pantries statewide. The meal packing is part of the two-day Maine Hunger Dialogue at the University of Maine’s Wells Conference Center that aims to mobilize the power of higher education to end hunger in the state. Event organizer Barbara Murphy, a University of Maine Cooperative Extension educator, said there’s a general misconception that if a college student can afford a semester at school, they can afford to eat. “One assumes if you’re attending there, all is good. Not so,” Murphy said. Attendees hope their collective efforts can inspire others to take action, according to the report. “No matter how small you think your effort is, it has ripple effects throughout the community and therefore throughout the state and the world,” Murphy said.