Archive for the ‘Engineering’ Category

CNF Potential at Paper Mill Covered By MassLive.com

Friday, December 19th, 2014

The University of Maine was highlighted in a MassLive.com story about Paperlogic, a 120-year-old paper mill in Turners Falls, Massachusetts, seeking to make new products with innovative cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) produced at the university. UMaine was recently awarded $350,000 to construct a commercial-scale CNF manufacturing plant with a capacity of 2 tons per day. The plant will accelerate CNF commercialization by making large quantities of it available to support the growth in application development activities. Paperlogic is a collaborator on the plant project that is funded by P3Nano.

UMaine Students Cited in BDN Report on Plans for Hampden Solid Waste Processing Plant

Tuesday, December 16th, 2014

University of Maine students were mentioned in a Bangor Daily News article about the Municipal Review Committee, a group representing the trash disposal interests of 187 Maine communities, announcing it plans to develop a $60 million solid waste recycling and processing facility in Hampden. The proposed garbage-to-energy facility will feature technology from Maryland-based Fiberight that reuses organic materials in trash to make biofuels, according to the article. In October, the Municipal Review Committee hired a team of students from UMaine’s Forest Bioproducts Research Institute (FBRI) led by Hemant Pendse, a UMaine professor who leads the FBRI research team focused on creating and commercializing new bioproducts. The team is tasked with studying the operations of Fiberight to determine if its technology will work in the colder temperatures of Maine, the article states. The report is scheduled to be finished in January.

Landis Mentioned in Berkeley Lab Article on Roman Architecture Research

Tuesday, December 16th, 2014

Eric Landis, a professor of civil engineering at the University of Maine, was mentioned in the Berkeley Lab news release, “Back to the future with Roman architectural concrete.” A discovery to understanding the longevity and endurance of Roman architectural concrete was made by researchers using beams of X-rays at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, according to the report. Landis is one of several co-authors of a paper describing the study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) titled “Mechanical Resilience and Cementitious Processes in Imperial Roman Architectural Mortar.” At UMaine, Landis measured bridging crack morphology using computed tomography scans of fractured mortar specimens, the release states.

Iberdrola Scholarship Program Accepting Applications to Study Energy, Environment

Monday, December 15th, 2014

The Iberdrola USA Foundation, along with Fundación Iberdrola, is accepting scholarship applications for master’s studies in energy and/or the environment at the University of Maine and University of Rochester for the 2015–2016 academic year, according to a press release.

The Iberdrola Scholarship Program is open to graduate students who plan to pursue studies in renewable energy, environmental protection, climate change or energy efficiency.

Global energy leader Iberdrola S.A. established the scholarship program in 2010. The grants cover tuition, health and accident insurance, and a $25,200 annual stipend for other expenses.

For more information or to apply, visit the Iberdrola Foundation scholarship website. Candidates should submit an application to one of the two universities before applying for the scholarship. The deadline to apply is 8 a.m. Feb. 13, 2015.

“Iberdrola and Iberdrola USA are very proud to support this next generation of renewable energy leaders,” said Bob Kump, chief corporate officer for Iberdrola USA.

Engineering Graduates Mentioned in Business Climate Article

Thursday, December 11th, 2014

University of Maine engineering graduates were mentioned in the Business Climate article, “Tech entrepreneurs flock to Maine’s quality of life, innovative culture.” The report focuses on Portland-based Kepware Technologies and states half of the company’s employees are UMaine graduates, including its CEO Tony Paine, who started as an engineer at the firm. Kepware also provides software and scholarships for UMaine engineering students.

National Clean Energy Report Unveiled, UMaine’s Efforts Praised, Media Report

Tuesday, December 9th, 2014

The Bangor Daily News, Maine Public Broadcasting Network, WABI (Channel 5) and WVII (Channel 7) reported Pew Charitable Trusts hosted an event and panel discussion at the University of Maine and unveiled the findings of its report “Clean Economy Rising.” The nonprofit found Maine is one of eight states leading the way in developing clean energy economies. Tom Swanson, manager of Pew’s clean energy initiative, said Pew took interest in UMaine’s efforts to expand the state’s wind energy to the Gulf of Maine with the deployment of VolturnUS, the first offshore floating wind turbine to be connected to an electric grid in the United States. Swanson added Pew heard many references to UMaine when researching energy initiatives in other states. The university helped companies across the nation with product testing and development in many forms, he said. “We were really impressed with the breadth of what the university is undertaking,” Swanson said. While at UMaine, Swanson toured the Advanced Structures and Composites Center and the Forest Bioproducts Research Institute, the BDN reported.

CUGR Announces 2014–2015 Research Fellows Assistants

Wednesday, November 19th, 2014

The University of Maine’s Center for Undergraduate Research (CUGR) has named the 2014–2015 Research Fellows Assistants.

The CUGR Research Fellows Program supports faculty efforts toward improving undergraduate research mentoring skills, expanding curricula to include research and scholarship experiences, and developing proposals for further funding specifically involving undergraduate students.

Each student selected as a Research Fellow Assistant is awarded a $1,000 stipend to assist a CUGR Research Fellow during the 2014–2015 academic year on a research topic of their choice. The faculty participants in this program were nominated by their respective deans and participated in a series of professional development workshops last spring.

More information about the CUGR Research Fellows Program is online.

The 2014–2015 CUGR Research Fellows Student Assistants:

  • Ashlyn Boyle of Belfast, Maine; sociology
  • Abigail Bradford of Westport Island, Maine; Earth and climate sciences
  • Hanjuan Cao of Changsha, China; food science and human nutrition
  • Audrey Cross of Brunswick, Maine; ecology and environmental sciences
  • Megan Dunphy of Pittsfield, Maine; psychology
  • Joseph Goodin of Orono, Maine; anthropology and Earth science
  • Thomas P. Hastings of Bear, Delaware; conservation biology
  • Cameron Huston of Washburn, Maine; political science, legal studies and sociology
  • Katherine Keaton of Caribou, Maine; theatre and dance
  • Amber Makela of Lyndeborough, New Hampshire; psychology, child development and disability studies
  • Aman Maskay of Kathmandu, Nepal; electrical engineering
  • Timothy McGrath of Carmel, Maine; mechanical engineering
  • Thomas McOscar of Bangor, Maine; chemistry
  • Seraphina Orsini of South Berwick, Maine; computer science
  • Kyle Pfau of Westfield, Massachusetts; marine science
  • Christopher Plaisted of Jonesboro, Maine; music education
  • Ethan Stetson of Woodland, Maine; psychology and military science
  • Ashley Thibeault of South Hamilton, Massachusetts; ecology and environmental sciences
  • Alex Lee Tuttle of Old Town, Maine; marketing and legal studies
  • Eric Veitch of Guilford, Connecticut; biology
  • Christopher Vincent of Nashua, New Hampshire; marketing and legal studies
  • Eric Wold of Freeport, Maine; mechanical engineering

The 2014–2015 CUGR Faculty Research Fellows:

  • Laura Artesani
  • Daniel Bilodeau
  • Tim Bowden
  • Nuri Emanetoglu
  • Nicholas Giudice
  • Robert Glover
  • William Gramlich
  • Hamish Greig
  • Mark Haggerty
  • Sarah Harlan-Haughey
  • Kim Huisman
  • Karl Kreutz
  • Jordan LaBouff
  • Roberto Lopez-Anido
  • Shannon McCoy
  • Reinhard Moratz
  • Balunkeswar Nayak
  • Brian Robinson
  • Mary Shea
  • Ebru Ulusoy
  • Faren R. Wolter

 

2014–2015 CUGR Fall Creative and Academic Achievement Fellowship Winners Announced

Friday, November 14th, 2014

The University of Maine’s Center for Undergraduate Research (CUGR) has announced the recipients of the CUGR Fall Creative and Academic Achievement Fellowships for 2014–15.

The fellowships were developed to enhance and increase undergraduate student involvement in faculty-supervised research, and awarded by the President’s Office.

Each fellowship provides a $1,000 award for the student to help cover costs of the project. The awards are supported through a PRE-VUE grant with additional funding from the Maine Economic Improvement Fund (MEIF).

The winning projects:

  • Wilson Adams of Barrington, Rhode Island, bioengineering, “A device for entrapment and microinjection of larval zebrafish”
  • Gwendolyn Beacham of Farmington, Maine, biochemistry, “Characterization of lysogeny regulation in the Cluster E mycobacteriophage Ukulele”
  • Jennifer LF Burnham of Bangor, Maine, microbiology, “Vaccine awareness assistance within the Greater Bangor area healthcare system”
  • Nina Caputo of Canaan, New Hampshire, chemistry, mathematics and environmental sciences, “Fluorescence monitoring of contaminant mixtures in surface fresh water”
  • Tyler Carrier of Barre, Vermont, “Cellular and molecular responses of sea urchin embryos to dissolved saxitoxins from the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense”
  • Nicklaus Carter of Franklin, Maine, bioengineering, “Magnetic properties of iron nanoparticles”
  • Joshua Deakin of Hampden, Maine, business, “Rituals in restaurants: Exploring how newcomers learn organizational culture”
  • Vincent DiGiovanni of Belmont, Massachusetts, biology and chemistry, “New approach to the treatment of Type 2 diabetes using inhibitors based on the acarviostatin family of natural products”
  • Nathan Dunn of Berwick, Maine, mathematics and computer science, “An enhancement of the P301dx application using advanced statistics”
  • Robert Fasano of Jefferson, Maine, physics, “Initialization of composite galaxies in dynamic equilibrium”
  • Scott Forand of Hermon, Maine, new media, “Tiny tactics”
  • Thomas Fouchereaux of Yarmouth, Maine, new media, “Commentrain”
  • Samuel Gates of Old Town, Maine, computer science, “Multi-tag radio frequency indication for indoor positional tracking system enhanced with accelerometer for fall detection”
  • Allison Goodridge of Bowdoin, Maine, mechanical engineering, “Motors and power: Generating physical phenomena for examination of spatial cognition and impulse response in virtual environments”
  • Katrina Harris of Ellsworth, Maine, business and microbiology, “Characterization of the integration morphology of mycobacteriophage ChipMunk including de novo assembly of the genome”
  • Hina Hashmi of Veazie, Maine, microbiology, “Is the ubiquitous antibacterial agent triclosan an uncoupler of mammalian mitochondria?”
  • Leslie Hood of Bangor, Maine, new media, “Epitaph: A humanistic approach to mortality and human-computer interaction”
  • Meghan Hurlburt of Union, Maine, computer science, “Noninvasive monitoring using radio frequency indicator technology: An inexpensive solution for independent aging in place”
  • Eliza Kane of Deer Isle, Maine, anthropology, “The geochemistry and historical ecology of a burnt Mississippian house at the Lawrenz Gun Club site in the central Illinois River Valley”
  • Charm Tharanga Karunasiri of Caribou, Maine, biochemistry, “Characterizing the catalytic domain of Calpain 5”
  • Jay Knowlton of Camden, Maine, biology, “Transplacental arsenic exposure effects on mouse hepatic protein expression”
  • Kathryn Liberman of Sumner, Illinois, marine science and aquaculture, “Developing a zebrafish model for Saprolegnia parasitica to investigate pathogenesis and alternate treatments”
  • Jason Lively of Wilbraham, Massachusetts, Earth sciences, “Neutralization capacity of major rock types found in Maine”
  • William London of Carrabassett Valley, Maine, mechanical engineering, “Experimental characterization of fatigue response of mechanically fastened joints in 3-D woven carbon composites”
  • Isaiah Nathaniel Mansour of Fairfield, Connecticut, marine science, “A comparative study of the hemocyanins of the giant keyhole limpet (Megathura crenulata) and the red abalone (Haliotis rufescens)”
  • Zakiah-Lee Meeks of Bangor, Maine, biology and pre-medicine, “Methylation patterns in OPRM1 and COMT variants during opioid withdrawal in the neonate”
  • Alexander William Moser of York, Maine, mechanical engineering and mathematics, “Clean CNG snowmobile”
  • Chelsea Ogun of North Providence, Rhode Island, anthropology, “Promoting and advancing climate education in Maine middle and high schools”
  • Brenden Peters of Orono, Maine, computer science, “Low-power device for indoor mapping and navigation”
  • Samuel Reynolds of Ellsworth, Maine, psychology and biology, “Investigating the role of NMDA receptors in long-term ethanol withdrawal”
  • Jena Rudolph of Old Town, Maine, human dimensions of climate change, “Assessing the efficacy of scenario building to alter perceptions of climate risk and stimulate climate adaptation planning”
  • Andrea Santariello of Tolland, Connecticut, marine science and zoology, “How prey selection contributes to Arctic tern breeding success and chick health at fledging”
  • Julia Sell of Cushing, Maine, physics, “Development of a combinatorial deposition method to allow for rapid synthesis and testing of nanolaminate thin film structures”
  • Adam Simard of Shelburne, New Hampshire, microbiology, “JCPyV internalization: Insight into scaffolding proteins and associated intracellular binding domains of serotonin 5-HT2 receptors”
  • Dustin Sleight of Orono, Maine, mechanical engineering, “Dynamic motion control: Generating physical phenomena for examination of spatial cognition and impulse response in virtual environments”
  • Bryer Sousa of Shapleigh, Maine, chemistry and mathematics, “Two-temperature model molecular dynamics study of the coalescence of metal nanoparticles”
  • Margaret Stavros of Freeport, Maine, biochemistry, “Prenatal exposure to methadone’s effect on the oxytocin receptor pathway”
  • Cody Thies of Pittsfield, Maine, psychology, “Adrenergic modulation of voluntary ethanol intake in C3H/HeJ mice in a chronic intermittent exposure protocol”
  • Ethan Tremblay of Mariaville, Maine, economics and journalism, “An examination of the pro-social impacts of local food purchasing”
  • Ryan A. Wahle of Round Pond, Maine, new media and Spanish, “New age versatile furniture”
  • Emily Whitaker of Westport Island, Maine, molecular and cellular biology, “Identification and characterization of mycobacteriophage Ukulele integration site attP”

UMaine Mentioned in E&E Publishing Articles on Ocean Energy

Friday, November 14th, 2014

The University of Maine was mentioned in two Environment & Energy Publishing articles that focused on ocean energy. The first article mentioned the new wind and wave laboratory being built at UMaine. W² is the world’s first wind and wave lab to feature a rotating open-jet wind tunnel above a 100-foot-long by 30-foot-wide by 15-foot-deep wave basin. The tank will be used to test offshore wind technology and marine hydrokinetic devices, according to the report. The second article cited UMaine’s efforts to monitor ocean energy’s effects on wildlife and fishermen.

VolturnUS Platform Featured in Windpower Monthly Article

Friday, November 14th, 2014

Windpower Monthly published an article about the platform of VolturnUS, a prototype that’s one-eighth the scale of a full-size offshore wind turbine that was deployed off the coast of Castine in June 2013. VolturnUS was created by the University of Maine-led DeepCwind Consortium. During its deployment, the platform has experienced storm conditions allowing UMaine to gather data on how it copes in rough seas, the article states.