Archive for the ‘Honors College’ Category

Glover Writes BDN Article on Ways to Keep College Grads in Bangor Area

Tuesday, May 26th, 2015

Rob Glover, an assistant professor of Honors and political science at the University of Maine, wrote an article for the Bangor Daily News titled “5 ways to keep recent college grads in the Bangor area.” The article cited research conducted by Glover’s students Cameron Huston, Sarah Nicols, Spencer Warmuth and Gareth Warr. The students worked in collaboration with the city of Bangor and city councilors to determine what makes recent UMaine graduates settle within the Bangor area. Glover says the city could help retain more college graduates by growing opportunities for internship and work experience; coordinating events and programming to get students to Bangor; marketing the downtown area; providing quality affordable housing; and supporting quality public school systems. The full study is online.

UMaine Humanities Center Awards Summer Research Grants

Wednesday, May 13th, 2015

The University of Maine Humanities Center has awarded summer research grants to two UMaine students.

Taylor Cunningham, an English major and Honors student with a minor in folklore studies, was awarded the Sandy and Bobby Ives Research Award. Elisa Sance, a doctoral candidate in history, was awarded the center’s graduate student research award. Each award is worth $500.

Cunningham of Massachusetts is the coordinator of a new interdisciplinary humanities series of lectures on linguistics and culture, and has been working on the Maine Hermit Project for two years.

The project is a collaborative interdisciplinary humanities lab venture involving a team of undergraduate researchers working with Sarah Harlan-Haughey, an assistant professor in UMaine’s Honors College and  Department of English.

“As a student research assistant on the Maine Hermit project, I study the historical hermits of Maine — who they were and what they can tell us about the communities that remember them,” Cunningham says, adding she spends a lot of time researching old newspapers and the archives in the Maine Folklife Center, as well as conducting fieldwork around the state.

She says fieldwork is essential to a project that relies on oral history, and has visited historical societies and museums in Patten, Oxford Hills and Monhegan Island. She plans to travel more this summer, and the grant will help with related costs.

While a graduate teaching assistant at UMaine, Sance taught French in the Department of Modern Languages and Classics. For her doctorate, she is focusing on language policies in the 1960s and 1970s in New Brunswick and their effect on people in northern Maine.

This summer, Sance will study the role of the family unit in the transmission of the French language in U.S. and Canadian communities in the Madawaska region.

“The French-speaking population in the Madawaska region was divided by the establishment of the official border between Maine and New Brunswick in 1842. This population shares a common past but has evolved within different legal and political frameworks,” Sance says.

Sance also plans to collect data on the structure and evolution of the family unit as they relate to the establishment of public school systems in New Brunswick and Maine. She is specifically seeking information on the level of education, occupation(s), religious orientation, and size and composition of families.

Sance plans to conduct research at the Blake Library at the University of Maine Fort Kent and the Acadian Archives, which are housed in the same building. The facilities offer several useful documents that are not available anywhere else, Sance says. She also plans to use resources at the University of Moncton at Edmundston, New Brunswick.

She intends to present the paper at a conference organized by the Association of Canadian Studies in the United States in October, and at an on-campus event in March 2016, part of a monthlong series of programs to celebrate the French-speaking world.

The Sandy and Bobby Ives Research Award is funded by David Taylor and LeeEllen Friedland, and the graduate student award comes from other University of Maine Humanities Center (UMHC) funds.

For more information about UMHC, email director Liam Riordan at riordan@maine.edu or visit the center’s website.

Hampden Family Earns Ninth Degree at Commencement, Weekly Reports

Tuesday, May 12th, 2015

The Weekly published a University of Maine news release about a Hampden-based family that at Commencement earned its ninth UMaine degree among six immediate members. On Saturday, Margaret McCollough received a bachelor’s degree in sustainable agriculture. She is the daughter of Catherine Elliott, a sustainable living specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, and Mark McCollough of Hampden, who met at UMaine in the 1980s and both hold two UMaine degrees. Margaret McCollough’s boyfriend Garth Douston, who she also met at UMaine, has a bachelor’s degree in sustainable agriculture. Margaret McCollough’s brother Aaron McCollough completed a bachelor’s degree in computer and electrical engineering and a master’s degree in computer engineering. While pursuing that degree, he became engaged to Morgan Burke, who completed her bachelor’s degree in wildlife ecology.

Media Cover UMaine’s 213th Commencement

Monday, May 11th, 2015

The Associated Press and Maine Public Broadcasting Network were among news organizations to report on the University of Maine’s 213th Commencement. M. Peter McPherson, president of the Washington, D.C.-based Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, delivered the Commencement address and received an honorary degree. Dana Connors, executive director of the Maine State Chamber of Commerce, and Dennis Rezendes of Colorado, who pioneered the hospice program in the U.S., also received honorary degrees, according to the AP. The Bangor Daily News, WABI (Channel 5) and WVII (Channel 7) reported on UMaine graduate Johanna Haskell — the great-great-granddaughter of Edwin James Haskell, one of six members of UMaine’s first graduating class in 1872. “I am incredibly proud to both carry on the legacy of our family and to have accomplished a personal goal of graduating,” Haskell said. Seacoastonline, WMTW (Channel 8 in Portland) and seattlepi carried the AP report.

Part of the Legacy: UMaine Grads Reminded of Their Role in Carrying the Land Grant Mission Forward

Saturday, May 9th, 2015

More than 10,800 family members, friends and colleagues filled Harold Alfond Sports Arena May 9 for the two ceremonies of the 213th Commencement at the University of Maine.

An estimated 1,687 undergraduate and graduate students participated in Commencement, one of the largest graduation events in the state. This year’s Commencement is part of UMaine’s 150th anniversary celebration.

Commencement speaker M. Peter McPherson, president of the Washington, D.C.-based Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, told members of the Class of 2015 that they are now part of UMaine’s 150-year legacy — and have a role to play.

“This institution’s work and commitment to bettering Maine are found in its students and in every corner of the state,” McPherson said. “The University of Maine is committed to its public purpose of seeking new knowledge, and helping to solve problems throughout Maine and beyond.”

The University of Maine has lived up to the vision of the Morrill Act, signed into law by President Abraham Lincoln, to enable every state to have a land grant college with a statewide mission of teaching, research and public service, McPherson said.

“This land grant, sea grant and flagship university will continue to change, but it also will continue to be more than the sum of its parts,” McPherson said. “No other institution in Maine is in position to play the same leadership role in academic, research and engagement within the system and for the whole state.”

UMaine’s land grant mission is “at the center of its being” and imparts an obligation on its graduates to be “constantly working to make a more fair, just and prosperous world.”

“Being from a land grant institution, particularly one as notable as the University of Maine, means that you have an obligation to carry that land grant status with you — and as part of you — for the rest of your life,” said McPherson.

“The University of Maine sweatshirt you now have should not just be a sign of where you’re from, but where you’re going,” McPherson said.

The morning Commencement ceremony included the College of Education and Human Development, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the Division of Lifelong Learning, and the Maine Business School. The afternoon ceremony includes the College of Engineering, and the College of Natural Sciences, Forestry, and Agriculture.

Honorary doctorates were awarded to McPherson, and alumni Dana Connors of Gray, Maine, president of the Maine State Chamber of Commerce, and Dennis Rezendes of Boulder, Colorado, who pioneered the hospice program in the United States.

This year’s valedictorian is Gwendolyn Beacham of Farmington, Maine, a biochemistry major and honors student. The salutatorian is Katelyn Massey of Waterville, Maine, a psychology major with a concentration in development and a minor in communication sciences and disorders, and a member of the UMaine women’s ice hockey team.

Also honored were four faculty members in civil engineering, philosophy, history and communication who received UMaine’s highest awards:

The 2015 Distinguished Maine Professor is Bill Davids, the John C. Bridge Professor of Civil Engineering. The annual award is presented by the University of Maine Alumni Association in recognition of outstanding achievement in UMaine’s statewide mission of teaching, research and economic development, and community engagement.

Kirsten Jacobson, associate professor of philosophy, is the 2015 Presidential Outstanding Teaching Award winner; Richard Judd, Col. James C. McBride Distinguished Professor of History, the 2015 Presidential Research and Creative Achievement Award; and Laura Lindenfeld, director of the Margaret Chase Smith Policy Center and associate professor of communication, the 2015 Presidential Public Service Achievement Award.ads reminded of their role in carrying the land grant mission forward.

Contact: Margaret Nagle, 207.581.3745

Immediate Family to Hold Nine Degrees from UMaine Following Commencement

Wednesday, May 6th, 2015

When Margaret McCollough graduates from the University of Maine at the institution’s 213th Commencement on May 9, her immediate family will hold nine degrees from the university.

McCollough, who will earn a bachelor’s degree in sustainable agriculture, is the daughter of Catherine Elliott and Mark McCollough of Hampden, who met at UMaine in the 1980s.

Elliott, a sustainable living specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, came to UMaine in 1980 to pursue a master’s degree in wildlife management, which she completed in 1983. As a student, she met her now-husband, Mark McCollough, who also was working on a master’s in wildlife management, which he earned in 1982.

The pair stayed at UMaine to complete their doctoral degrees in wildlife. Mark McCollough earned his Ph.D. in 1986 and Elliott earned hers a year later.

In 2011, the couple’s son Aaron McCollough completed a bachelor’s degree in computer and electrical engineering while also a student of the Honors College. He continued at UMaine to earn a master’s degree in computer engineering in 2013. While pursuing that degree, he became engaged to Morgan Burke, who completed her bachelor’s degree in wildlife ecology in 2012 and brought the family’s degree total to seven.

Margaret McCollough’s boyfriend Garth Douston, who she also met at UMaine, has a bachelor’s degree in sustainable agriculture, which he earned in 2014. With Margaret McCollough’s graduation, the family will hold nine UMaine degrees among six members.

“Margaret’s graduation will be wonderful,” her mother says. “Going to college was not at the top of her list of things to do when she completed high school, so having her graduate from a program she has loved is incredible. And to have had her at UMaine for the past four years has been icing on the cake. We are very proud of her.”

Margaret McCollough says she hadn’t planned to go to college after graduating from high school. She worked for a summer on a couple of farms out west before she discovered that UMaine had a sustainable agriculture program. She decided it was time to make a change and came back to enroll in the program that fall semester.

The program provided her with opportunities to network and build relationships with those already working in agriculture throughout Maine, she says.

“To be a good farmer you have to have a good working understanding of multiple disciplines. It won’t happen for you just out of a love of nature and an ability to do physical work. UMaine has provided me with a breadth of knowledge and analytical skills that will certainly serve me well as I work to build both a sustainable and profitable farm,” Margaret McCollough says.

Margaret McCollough and Douston now run Sweet Thyme Farm in Arundel, Maine. This past summer was the pair’s first season. They planted about 1.5 acres of crops and plan to add another acre this year. The farm, which has been certified by the Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association (MOFGA), produces a variety of vegetables and some herbs, as well as raises ducks and chickens for eggs.

Margaret McCollough credits two student-run agricultural programs for giving her and Douston the confidence to start the farm. For two summers, Douston managed the Black Bear Food Guild, a student-run community supported agriculture (CSA) program; and she managed UMaine Greens, a winter greens production program run by student volunteers.

“Both of these programs require those students who participate to take on a lot of responsibility,” she says, adding they allow students the chance to grow at production scale while managing customers and co-workers, meeting deadlines, staying on budgets and keeping accurate records.

Margaret McCollough says UMaine has allowed herself and her family to do work that makes them happy.

“My mom, dad and older brother love the work that they do; they’re so passionate about their disciplines, and also really good at what they do,” she says. “I will feel proud to join them in doing good work in a field that I feel really passionate about. I know that my parents are really proud of my brother and I; recognizing the value in education.”

While Elliott, Margaret McCollough’s mother, was finishing her Ph.D., she was hired as a research associate in the Department of Wildlife Ecology. After graduating, she became a faculty member with UMaine Cooperative Extension. By June, Elliott will have been employed by UMaine for 29 years.

Elliott’s husband Mark McCollough works on endangered species recovery at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Ecological Services Maine Field Office in Orono.

“My parents still gather with a large group of friends that they made while studying here, and they’ve become mentors and basically extended family members to my brother and I growing up,” Margaret McCollough says.

Aaron McCollough and his fiance Burke live in Manchester, New Hampshire where Burke is pursuing a doctorate in physical therapy at Franklin Pierce University. Aaron McCollough works for L-3 Insight as an embedded software engineer. They will be relocating to Portland, Maine in June while Burke does clinical rotations to complete her degree.

UMaine’s 213th Commencement Set for May 9

Monday, May 4th, 2015

The 213th Commencement at the University of Maine will be held May 9 in Harold Alfond Sports Arena on campus.

UMaine Commencement, held in two ceremonies at 10 a.m. and 2:30 p.m., is one of the largest graduation events in the state and this year is part of the university’s 150th anniversary celebration. An estimated 1,687 undergraduate and graduate students are expected to participate.

Both ceremonies are ticketed events and live streaming will be available.

The morning ceremony includes the College of Education and Human Development, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the Division of Lifelong Learning, and the Maine Business School. The afternoon ceremony includes the College of Engineering, and the College of Natural Sciences, Forestry, and Agriculture.

Honorary doctorates will be awarded to alumni Dana Connors of Gray, Maine, president of the Maine State Chamber of Commerce, and Dennis Rezendes of Boulder, Colorado, who pioneered the hospice program in the United States; and M. Peter McPherson, president of the Washington, D.C.-based Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU).

McPherson is the Commencement speaker for both ceremonies.

This year’s valedictorian is Gwendolyn Beacham of Farmington, Maine, a biochemistry major and honors student. The salutatorian is Katelyn Massey of Waterville, Maine, a psychology major with a concentration in development and a minor in communication sciences and disorders, and a member of the UMaine women’s ice hockey team.

Also being honored will be four faculty members in civil engineering, philosophy, history and communication who received UMaine’s highest awards:

The 2015 Distinguished Maine Professor is Bill Davids, the John C. Bridge Professor of Civil Engineering. The annual award is presented by the University of Maine Alumni Association in recognition of outstanding achievement in UMaine’s statewide mission of teaching, research and economic development, and community engagement.

Kirsten Jacobson, associate professor of philosophy, is the 2015 Presidential Outstanding Teaching Award winner; Richard Judd, Col. James C. McBride Distinguished Professor of History, the 2015 Presidential Research and Creative Achievement Award; and Laura Lindenfeld, director of the Margaret Chase Smith Policy Center and associate professor of communication, the 2015 Presidential Public Service Achievement Award.

Contact: Margaret Nagle, 207.581.3745

Maine Edge, Weekly Report on Undergraduate Research and Academic Showcase Winners

Tuesday, April 28th, 2015

The Maine Edge and The Weekly published a University of Maine news release announcing the winners of the sixth annual Undergraduate Research and Academic Showcase. The event, sponsored by UMaine’s Center for Undergraduate Research, was open to any undergraduate at the university and featured 121 presentations from 229 students in the form of posters, oral presentations or performances, and exhibits. Also announced at the April showcase were the five winners of a $3,000 Summer Research and Creative Academic Achievements Fellowship.

2015 Rezendes Ethics Essay Winners Announced

Monday, April 27th, 2015

John William Mukose, a third-year chemical engineering major and Honors College student, is the winner of the 2015 John M. Rezendes Annual Ethics Essay Competition.

Mukose of Kampala, Uganda received $2,800 and a commemorative sculpture for his essay, “The Ethics of Using Indoor Residual Spraying of DDT to Control Malaria in Uganda.”

Afton Hupper, a sophomore from Owls Head, Maine received the second-place prize of $300 for the essay, “A World for Everyone: The Common Good Approach to Reaching Global Peace Through Sustainability.” Hupper is an ecology and environmental sciences major and Honors College student.

All UMaine undergraduates were invited to submit an 8- to 10-page essay for the annual competition. The 2015 theme was “Impacting Nature: The Ethics of Energy, Ecology and the Environment.”

A financial gift from Dennis and Beau Rezendes provides the university the opportunity to annually offer the John M. Rezendes Ethics Essay Competition in conjunction with hosting the John M. Rezendes Visiting Scholar in Ethics.

Baird Callicott, a philosophy professor at the University of North Texas, delivered this year’s John M. Rezendes Visiting Scholar in Ethics Lecture on Earth Day. The topic was “Thinking Like a Planet: The Land Ethic and the Earth Ethic.”

2015 Undergraduate Research and Academic Showcase Winners

Tuesday, April 21st, 2015

Student research was displayed during the 6th annual Undergraduate Research and Academic Showcase on April 14.

The event, sponsored by UMaine’s Center for Undergraduate Research (CUGR), was open to any undergraduate at the university and featured 121 presentations from 229 students in the form of 92 posters, 16 oral presentations or performances, and 13 exhibits. Several presentations included multiple students.

Following are the winning presentations:

Exhibits

  • Samuel Gates of Old Town, Maine; and M​eghan Hurlburt of Union, Maine, “M​ulti-Tag Radio Frequency Indication for Use in Indoor Positional Tracking Systems;”​ adviser: Nicholas Giudice, School of Computing and Information Science

Oral Presentations

  • D​anielle Walczak of Lee, New Hampshire, “Forward, Not Back: Young People’s Search for Farming and Community in Maine;” adviser: Melissa Ladenheim, Honors College (first place)
  • V​incent Digiovanni of Belmont, Massachusetts, “Chemical Degradation and Functionalization of Acarbose for the Creation and Study of Novel Alpha Amylase Inhibitors Related to the Acarviostatin Family of Natural Products;” Adviser: Matthew Brichacek, Department of Chemistry (second place)

Posters

  • Eliza Kane of Deer Isle, Maine, “T​he Geochemistry and Historical Ecology of a Burnt Mississippian House at the Lawrenz Gun Club Site in the Central Illinois River Valley;” adviser: Alice Kelley, School of Earth and Climate Sciences (first place)
  • K​ai Hermansen of Old Town, Maine; Abbie Gray of Poland, Maine; Evan Nadeau of Brewer, Maine; Viktoria Staples of Brooklin, Maine; and Roger Brasslett of Brewer, Maine, “Exercise Education at Brewer High School Health Class;” adviser: Elizabeth Bicknell, School of Nursing (second place)
  • Jacob Posik of Turner, Maine; Cameron Marcotte of Lewiston, Maine; Jacob Hatch of Portland, Maine; Harold Trey Stewart III of Presque Isle, Maine; and Adam Thibodeau of Bangor, Maine, “Confronting The Challenges of Studentification in Residential Orono Neighborhoods;” adviser: Robert Glover, Department of Political Science (third place)

Also announced at the showcase were the five winners of a $3,000 Summer Research and Creative Academic Achievements Fellowship:

  • Spencer Desrochers of Biddeford, Maine, “Optimizing Power Usage of Modern Computing Systems;” adviser: Vincent Weaver, electrical and computer engineering
  • Ailish Foley of Montville, Maine, “The Effects of Collection Time, Auxin Concentration, and Wounding on Root Formation of Softwood and Semi-Hardwood Cuttings of Rhododendron Canadense;” adviser: Bryan Peterson, School of Food and Agriculture
  • Zachary Mason of Wells, Maine, “Increasing Resolution of Tropical Last Glacial Maximum Record with Cosmogenic Surface Exposure-Dating;” Brenda Hall, Earth and Climate Sciences
  • Scott Mitchell of Haymarket, Virginia, “Use of FAME Profiling to Detect Differences in Microbial Activity in Compost from Horses Treated with and without Antibiotics;” adviser: Robert Causey, School of Food and Agriculture
  • Jessica Moore of Bangor, Maine, “Investigating a Link Between Inflammation and Invasive Candidiasis;” adviser: Robert Wheeler, molecular and biomedical sciences