Archive for the ‘Honors College’ Category

Honorary Doctorates

Monday, April 20th, 2015

The University of Maine will award honorary doctorates on May 9 to alumni Dana Connors of Gray, Maine, president of the Maine State Chamber of Commerce, and Dennis Rezendes of Boulder, Colorado, who pioneered the hospice program in the United States; and M. Peter McPherson, president of the Washington, D.C.-based Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU).

The honorary doctorates will be conferred at UMaine’s 213th Commencement, part of the university’s 150th anniversary celebration.

McPherson will deliver a keynote address at both the 10 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. ceremonies.

Dana Connors
As the leader of the state’s largest and most diverse business association for more than 20 years, Dana Connors oversees the Maine State Chamber’s broad range of activities: advocacy efforts, economic development initiatives, workforce development opportunities, and a wide variety of member services on behalf of the state’s business community.

Connors began his career as the city manager of Presque Isle for 16 years, and then spent 11 years as commissioner of the Maine Department of Transportation. He has been president of the Maine State Chamber of Commerce since 1994.

A Maine native, Connors received a bachelor’s degree in public management from UMaine in 1965. He has been appointed by the Governor to serve on the Northern New England Passenger Rail Authority and the State of Maine Governor’s Business Roundtable for Early Childhood Development. Other boards on which he currently serves include Maine Economic Research Institute; Maine Manufacturing Extension Partnership; and Maine & Company.

Dennis Rezendes
Dennis Rezendes provided national leadership to improve end-of-life care for millions of people by helping establish the hospice program in this country, offering quality and compassionate care for those with terminal illnesses. As a volunteer and philanthropist, he devoted himself to educational and social justice causes at home and abroad. He is a strong believer in the power of education to open minds and change lives. With his wife, he has contributed generously to scholarships and the arts, and has created UMaine endowments to support a visiting scholar in ethics, an ethics essay competition and the Honors College.

Under the auspicious of the Global Volunteers organization, he also endowed a program enabling a student to volunteer for two weeks in a Third World country.

Rezendes is a member of the Charles F. Allen Society, President’s Club and Stillwater Society. In 2012 he received the Stillwater Presidential Award. In 2014, he was the recipient of Bernard Lown ’42 Alumni Humanitarian Award. He received the Founder’s Award from the National Hospice Organization (NHO), which provided national leadership to define hospice and develop the standards of hospice care. Rezendes provided direct leadership in the passage of federal legislation enabling hospice care to be a Medicare benefit. In New Haven, Connecticut in 1974, he became the nation’s first hospice executive director, guiding the development of the first hospice program of care.

Of Portuguese heritage, Rezendes is a second-generation immigrant and the first of his family to graduate from college. After graduating from UMaine in 1957 as an honors student with a degree in public management, he continued his education at the University of Pennsylvania, the Wharton School. From 1960–70 he served as director of administration for the City of New Haven, Connecticut. He has had a successful career both in government and the private sector.

Peter McPherson
Since 2006, M. Peter McPherson has been president of the Washington, D.C.-based APLU. The association, founded in 1887, is North America’s oldest higher education association, comprised of public research universities, land-grant institutions and universities in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, four territories, Canada and Mexico. APLU is the leading research, policy and advocacy organization for public research universities like UMaine.

McPherson also chairs the Partnership to Cut Hunger and Poverty in Africa, an organization he co-founded to address agricultural production and rural income issues. He is chair of the advisory committee for HarvestPlus, an organization funded at approximately $40 million annually to research the biofortification of crops grown by workers in poor countries. Biofortification is the genetic improvement of crops to fortify them with vitamin A, iron and zinc.

From 1993–2004, McPherson served as president of his alma mater, Michigan State University. Prior to that, he was a group executive vice president with Bank of America, based in San Francisco. He also served as deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of the Treasury and the administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). McPherson is a former chair of the board of directors of Dow Jones and Company, publisher of The Wall Street Journal.

McPherson received an MBA from Western Michigan University and a J.D. from American University Law School.

Dollars & Sense Publishes Article by Welcomer, Haggerty, Jemison

Friday, April 17th, 2015

Dollars & Sense: Real World Economics published, “Maine farmers and climate change: Reactive or proactive?” by three University of Maine professors. The article was written by Stephanie Welcomer, an associate professor of management and associate dean of the Maine Business School; Mark Haggerty, an associate professor of Honors and Rezendes Preceptorship of Civil Engagement; and John Jemison, a soil and water quality specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension.

Weekly Advances Undergraduate Research and Academic Showcase

Thursday, April 9th, 2015

The Weekly published a University of Maine news release previewing the 2015 Undergraduate Research and Academic Showcase to be held April 14 at Wells Conference Center. More than 200 students will display their research during the sixth annual event sponsored by UMaine’s Center for Undergraduate Research. Presentations in the form of posters, oral presentations and performances will be featured.

Rezendes Ethics Lecture Set for Earth Day

Wednesday, April 8th, 2015

Baird Callicott, a philosophy professor at the University of North Texas, will present the 2015 John M. Rezendes Visiting Scholar in Ethics Lecture at 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 22, in Nutting Hall, Room 100 at the University of Maine.

Callicott’s Earth Day lecture is titled, “Thinking Like a Planet: The Land Ethic and the Earth Ethic.” A reception will be held at 3:30 p.m.

Callicott is the University Distinguished Research Professor of Philosophy and formerly the Regents Professor of Philosophy at the University of North Texas. He is the co-editor-in-chief of the Encyclopedia of Environmental Ethics and Philosophy and has written or edited several books, journal articles and chapters on environmental philosophy and ethics. He has served as president of the International Society for Environmental Ethics, Yale University’s bioethicist-in-residence, and visiting senior research scientist at the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center.

Callicott’s research focuses on theoretical environmental ethics, comparative environmental ethics and philosophy, the philosophy of ecology and conservation policy, and climate ethics.

The John M. Rezendes Visiting Scholar in Ethics Lecture was established in 1999 to critically engage students, faculty and the community in ethical issues of national importance.

The lecture is part of the John M. Rezendes Ethics Initiative, a program established through a gift from Dennis and Beau Rezendes, which also includes the John M. Rezendes Ethics Essay Contest open to undergraduate students at UMaine.

For more information or to request a disability accommodation, contact Nick Moore at 581.3285 or nicholas.moore@umit.maine.edu.

Nineteen UMaine Faculty Members Receive Tenure and/or Promotion, Weekly Reports

Wednesday, April 1st, 2015

The Weekly reported the University of Maine System Board of Trustees has approved promotion and/or tenure for 19 University of Maine faculty members. The faculty were nominated by UMaine President Susan J. Hunter based on a peer and administrative review of their successful work in teaching, research and public service. “The annual tenure and promotion process is truly a celebration of the excellence of our faculty,” said President Hunter. “They are key to helping UMaine fulfill its statewide mission of teaching, research, scholarship, economic development and outreach. And they are essential to the UMaine distinction — from the student experience and community engagement to the national- and international-caliber research.”

2015 Undergraduate Research and Academic Showcase April 14

Tuesday, March 31st, 2015

More than 200 University of Maine students will display their research during the 2015 Undergraduate Research and Academic Showcase on Tuesday, April 14 at Wells Conference Center.

The sixth annual event, which runs from 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m., is sponsored by UMaine’s Center for Undergraduate Research (CUGR) and is open to any undergraduate at the university. A total of 121 presentations from 229 students in the form of 92 posters, 16 oral presentations or performances, and 13 exhibits will be featured. Several presentations include multiple students.

A new electronic judging system will allow the 40 judges to score presentations online using a tablet or smartphone.

Students presenting projects that receive the highest scores from judges in each format will receive research scholar medals and cash awards ranging from $100 to $200 in various categories.

Associate Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies David Neivandt will deliver opening remarks at 9 a.m. UMaine President Susan J. Hunter and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Jeff Hecker will present awards and give closing remarks starting at 4 p.m. The awards presentation will include the announcement of five Summer Research and Creative Academic Achievements Fellowship winners, who will each receive a $3,000 fellowship.

The UMaine community and general public are welcome to attend the free event. Participants and guests can follow the showcase on Twitter and Instagram using #CUGR2015. For more information or to request disability accommodations, call CUGR at 581.3583, or email CUGR@maine.edu, using “CUGR showcase guest request” as the subject. More information, including an event program, is online.

Weekly Advances Poetry Event at Bangor Library

Wednesday, March 25th, 2015

The Weekly reported the Bangor Public Library in cooperation with the University of Maine and the University of Maine Museum of Art will host the 13th annual POETS/SPEAK! celebration Saturday, April 4. The daylong event is one of the largest free poetry festivals in Maine, according to the article. This year’s program will feature more than 25 well-known and emerging poets from around the state, as well as UMaine students and lecturers.

Kelsey Rosebeary: Top Cadet

Tuesday, March 17th, 2015

Kelsey Rosebeary of Poulsbo, Washington is a fourth-year nursing major with minors in French and military science. She is a member of the U.S. Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) and has received the 2015 Nurse Cadet Excellence Award.

According to Lt. Col. Charles Rote, professor of military science of the Army ROTC program at UMaine, the award is given annually to the top Army ROTC nursing cadet in the nation.

“Every year, thousands of Army cadets compete to receive a commission from the president of the United States to serve as a second lieutenant in the Army,” Rote says. “This past year, 5,617 cadets participating as a part of one of the 275 Army ROTC host detachments were evaluated and rank-ordered on their academic, leadership and athletic abilities. Of the 215 nurses who underwent this process, Ms. Rosebeary was No. 1.”

What does it mean to receive the Nurse Cadet Excellence Award?
When I first received the news that I had received the Nurse Cadet Excellence Award, I did not know it was even an award to be won. Since beginning my career as a student at the University of Maine, I have done what I know how to do, and that is work hard to reach my goals.

Hearing the words, “No. 1 nursing cadet in the nation” is absolutely surreal. I still have difficulty believing it.

Receiving this award not only represents the hard work I have put in, but it also speaks volumes about the nursing school here at the university and the ROTC program. Both programs have instilled leadership qualities and attributes in me that have made me deserving of this award.

I am absolutely honored to have received the Nurse Cadet Excellence Award, and am honored to have received my education at the fine institution that is the University of Maine.

What made you want to study nursing?
This is a question we get asked a lot as nursing students. Every story is unique, and mine is no exception. When my grandmother was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, my paternal grandfather became her primary caretaker. He had no medical experience or training prior to her being diagnosed, but what he had was love and a caring discipline. Never once did she get a bedsore, and my grandfather was sure to keep her hygiene in immaculate condition.

About six years after my grandmother passed away, my grandfather had a stroke and was in the hospital, unconscious. One of the nurses who took care of him was so rough and careless in his tasks and treatments. My grandfather had received no professional training in how to care for my grandmother, but he showed more care and compassion than someone who was supposed to be a professional.

It was there that I made a personal vow to show the same amount of compassion toward every patient I took care of that my grandfather showed to my grandmother.

Why did you decide to join ROTC?
There are many reasons students join ROTC. A major reason I joined ROTC was the financial stability that it could provide me as a student, as well as the occupational stability it would provide me once I graduated and became an officer.

In addition, I joined for the experiences I would receive in the field of nursing. Instead of being in a static position as a civilian nurse, the Army would provide me with opportunities to travel the country and the world.

Why UMaine?
The University of Maine sent me a packet in the mail my junior year of high school describing the school of nursing and what the university had to offer. My first choice, at this point and time was the University of Washington in Seattle. After applying and being accepted to both universities, I changed my mind.

The University of Maine treated me with such friendliness and respect when I called their offices, and they made me feel like I already had a purpose.

After much discussion with my family and friends, I decided to send in my letter of acceptance to the University of Maine and pack my bags for the East Coast.

Describe your internship experience:
During the summer of 2014, I had the opportunity to attend a nursing internship through the ROTC program. I spent four weeks at the Tripler Army Medical Center in Honolulu, Hawaii working alongside an Army registered nurse.

I was able to perform tasks and gain skills that many nursing students do not get the opportunity to do. I learned how to perform venipuncture and start IVs. I was able to hang blood transfusions, do blood draws and help intubate patients for surgery.

Over the course of four weeks, I worked 150 clinical hours and gained an extraordinary amount of confidence in my abilities to perform quality nursing care and be a leader on a nursing unit.

What’s your most memorable UMaine moment so far?
When I got to ride in a Black Hawk to one of our ROTC training events my sophomore year. My smile was from ear to ear, and lasted the entire weekend.

What difference has UMaine made in your life and in helping you reach your goals?
A tremendous difference. The education I have received here, the opportunities I have had to lead others and travel around the world, and the people I have met have all impacted my last four years, and surely the next 50.

I have met people that I will know and keep in contact with for the rest of my life. The professors I have had and the cadre I have had through ROTC will always be there to give me advice or send my future employers letters of recommendation. And the education and training I have received will stick with me for the rest of my life.

I am very grateful that I chose the University of Maine for my undergraduate experience.

What are your plans for after graduation and long-term career goals?
The day after graduation, I will be getting married, planning to take my board exam for nursing, and spending my last free summer with my family back in Washington before I head to Fort Sam Houston in Texas for my basic officer leader course. Nine weeks later I will be on my way to my first duty station.

I plan to make the Army my career — serving this nation the best I can, learning from soldiers I work with, and providing the best nursing care to every patient I come into contact with.

 

Nineteen UMaine Faculty Members Receive Tenure and/or Promotion

Monday, March 16th, 2015

The University of Maine System Board of Trustees has approved promotion and/or tenure for 19 University of Maine faculty members. The faculty were nominated by UMaine President Susan J. Hunter based on a peer and administrative review of their successful work in teaching, research and public service.

“The annual tenure and promotion process is truly a celebration of the excellence of our faculty,” says UMaine President Susan J. Hunter. “They are key to helping UMaine fulfill its statewide mission of teaching, research, scholarship, economic development and outreach. And they are essential to the UMaine distinction — from the student experience and community engagement to the national- and international-caliber research.”

University of Maine Faculty Promoted and/or Tenured, 2014-15

Promoted to professor

College of Education and Human Development

  • Susan K. Gardner, Higher Education

College of Engineering

  • Ali Abedi, Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Philip A. Dunn, Jr., Construction Management Technology
  • Michael D. Mason, Chemical and Biological Engineering
  • Judith R. Pearse, Electrical Engineering Technology
  • Yifeng Zhu, Electrical and Computer Engineering

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

  • Amy M. Blackstone, Sociology
  • Laura A. Lindenfeld, Mass Communication/Media Studies and Public Policy
  • Nathan E. Stormer, Communication and Journalism

College of Natural Sciences, Forestry, and Agriculture

  • Kathleen P. Bell, Resource Economics and Policy
  • John J. Daigle, Forest Recreation Management
  • Eric R. Gallandt, Weed Ecology and Management
  • Brian J. McGill, Ecological Modeling

Promoted to professor with tenure

College of Natural Sciences, Forestry, and Agriculture

  • Gordon S. Hamilton, Earth Sciences and Climate Change Institute

Promoted to associate professor with tenure

College of Natural Sciences, Forestry, and Agriculture

  • Brian J. Olsen, Biology and Ecology

Granted tenure at current rank of associate professor

Honors College

  • Mark E. Haggerty, Rezendes Preceptor of Civil Engagement

Promoted to Extension professor

  • Jennifer F. Lobley, Cooperative Extension

Promoted to associate Extension professor with continuing contract

  • Mitchell D. Mason, Cooperative Extension
  • Kathryn G. Yerxa, Cooperative Extension

Contact: Margaret Nagle, 207.581.3745

Student’s Honors Thesis Cited in Pacific Standard Report on Circus Elephants

Wednesday, March 11th, 2015

A 2014 Honors thesis by University of Maine psychology student Sophie Veilleux was cited in the Pacific Standard article, “Why do circus elephants get all the sympathy?” According to the article, Veilleux’s paper, “Coping with Dissonance: Psychological Mechanisms that Enable Ambivalent Attitudes Toward Animals,” focuses on four possibilities for why the majority of Americans, who generally care about the treatment of animals, show ambivalence toward livestock.