Archive for the ‘UMaine in the News’ Category

Sorg to Lead State Effort on Violent Death Data Collection, BDN Reports

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

The Bangor Daily News reported the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has awarded almost $1 million to Maine to help pay for gathering data on violent deaths using the National Violent Death Reporting System over the next five years. The grant will allow the state to compile information about the relationships between domestic abuse, homicide and suicide, according to the article. The data will supplement the work of groups such as the Domestic Abuse Homicide Review Panel, which examines domestic abuse homicides to understand how the deaths can be prevented. Marcella Sorg, a forensic anthropologist for the state and a research professor at the University of Maine, is leading the effort with Margaret Greenwald, the recently retired chief medical examiner. The two doctors previously analyzed drug death statistics, and their work has been nationally recognized and has provided information to guide Maine drug policy decisions, the article states.

Brewer Quoted in BDN Article on 1st Congressional District Race

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

Mark Brewer, a political science professor at the University of Maine, was quoted in the Bangor Daily News article, “With re-election bid seemingly secure, Pingree devotes attention — and cash — to electing other Democrats,” about incumbent U.S. Rep. Chellie Pingree and the 1st Congressional District race. Pingree is being challenged by political newcomers Isaac Misiuk, a Republican from Gorham, and Sanford independent Richard Murphy. “She has two challengers, but the reality is she’s unchallenged — there’s no way she’s not going to win,” Brewer said. “Especially when you have somebody who aspires to a leadership position, which everybody basically knows Pingree does, it’s common for them to spread the money around to other candidates and call those favors in later.”

Working Waterfront Publishes Op-Ed by Ph.D. Candidate

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

Stacy R. Knapp, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Maine and adjunct faculty instructor at Maine Maritime Academy in Castine, wrote an opinion piece for The Working Waterfront, about current research to measure the amounts of microplastics in the Gulf of Maine.

Monhegan Island Tourism Survey Led by Noblet Focus of Working Waterfront Article

Tuesday, October 21st, 2014

A survey of Monhegan Island’s summer visitors led by Caroline Noblet, an economics professor at the University of Maine, was the focus of the Working Waterfront article, “Monhegan tourism survey reveals low worry about wind project.” Researchers asked 180 summer visitors their views on the university’s proposed floating wind turbines off the island’s coast. According to the article, more than half of the study participants did not know about the wind power proposal; 70 percent said if built, the project would neither detract from nor enhance their visit; and 88 percent said turbines would not change the number of visits they would make to the island. Noblet said the survey was less about the project and more about “how people react to scientific information in decision making.”

BDN Advances Talk by Leading Rabbi in Christian-Jewish Relations

Tuesday, October 21st, 2014

The Bangor Daily News reported Rabbi A. James Rudin of Florida will speak at 3 p.m. Thursday in the Bangor Room of the Memorial Union at the University of Maine and at 7 p.m. the same day at Congregation Beth Israel in Bangor. Rudin is the senior interreligious adviser of the American Jewish Committee and has served as the organization’s longtime director of interreligious affairs, the article states. The title of Rudin’s UMaine talk is “The Jewish Jesus and the Christian Christ: Is There a Difference?” Rudin’s Maine appearances are sponsored by several groups including the UMaine Judaic Studies Program, Honors College and the Wilson Center.

Working Waterfront Interviews Rebar, Lichtenwalner About Pest Lab Bond Proposal

Tuesday, October 21st, 2014

The Working Waterfront spoke with John Rebar, executive director of the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, and Anne Lichtenwalner, director of UMaine’s Animal Health Laboratory, about Question 2 on the November ballot that will ask Maine voters to approve an $8 million bond for animal and plant diagnostic services. The bond would allow UMaine Extension to build a new facility on campus to house labs for the monitoring and testing of insects and pests that affect domestic and wild plants and animals in Maine. “As a state with a large international border, thousands of miles of coastlines, and people and goods coming to Maine ports every day, the threat of disease and invasive species is increasing annually. This threat can destroy crops, kill or injure livestock and pose a threat to public health,” Rebar said, adding staff is “very limited” in what they can do in the current lab.

UMaine Study Cited in Mainebiz Article on Monhegan Island Residents

Tuesday, October 21st, 2014

A University of Maine study was cited in the Mainebiz article, “On the edge: Monhegan Island’s year-round residents take charge of their future.” The study reported that residents of Maine’s 15 year-round islands pay at least one-third more for basic food items than the state average, according to the article. Recent UMaine graduate Ben Algeo also was mentioned in the article. Algeo graduated in May with a bachelor’s degree in political science and renewable energy. He is an Island Institute fellow working with Monhegan and Matinicus islands to identify their most pressing energy efficiency needs and possible solutions, the article states.

BDN Editorial Endorses Question 2, Stresses Importance of UMaine Extension Lab

Monday, October 20th, 2014

The Bangor Daily News published the editorial, “Yes on Question 2: Why it’s worth it to have a lab that tests ticks, moose and more,” about a bond that asks voters to support giving $8 million to the University of Maine Cooperative Extension to build a new animal and plant disease and insect control laboratory. “This $8 million bond is an investment in needed infrastructure at the University of Maine to better protect human health through insect-borne disease detection and food safety testing,” the article states.

WABI Covers Emera Astronomy Center Dedication

Monday, October 20th, 2014

WABI (Channel 5) reported on the dedication of the University of Maine’s Emera Astronomy Center. The center is the new home of the Maynard F. Jordan Planetarium and Observatory. “Although the weather is not perfect every day, we still have opportunities, and when the weather is clear, to see things a little differently than telescopes in Hawaii and Arizona might see them and we may see things that are not in the sky for them,” said Alan Davenport, director of the planetarium. “This is one of the most sophisticated astronomy centers that we have certainly in the state of Maine. It’s really exciting for young grade school students to come through this facility learn about astronomy,” said Gerry Chasse, president and COO of Emera Maine.

Ippolito Interviewed for New York Times Article on Preserving Social Media

Monday, October 20th, 2014

Jon Ippolito, a professor of new media at the University of Maine, spoke with The New York Times for an article about a digital recording tool called Colloq that aims to preserve the complex experience of using social networking websites such as Facebook. The tool has been roughly prototyped by Rhizome, a New York nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting and conserving digital artwork, according to the article. “As close as possible, you’re going to get the experience of interacting with the actual site,” said Ippolito, who has advised Rhizome and is familiar with the tool. “It is reconstructing it, bit by bit, in a technology that is very close to the original and allows users to explore it interactively the way they could with the original.” Ippolito also said giving people the tools to record their online activities is important. “It puts the ability to capture data back in the hands of the individuals. The user is in the driver’s seat, instead of the social network that now owns that user’s information,” he said. Ippolito’s recent book on digital preservation, “Re-collection: Art, New Media, and Social Memory,” also was mentioned in the article.