Archive for the ‘UMaine in the News’ Category

Breece Quoted in Press Herald Article on Aroostook County’s Personal Income Increase

Friday, November 21st, 2014

James Breece, an economics professor at the University of Maine, spoke with the Portland Press Herald for the article, “A surprise: Aroostook County has sharpest rise in personal income.” The article states Aroostook County’s personal income grew by 4.4 percent in 2013; above the national average for the year of 1.3 percent. In Piscataquis County, which has been Maine’s poorest county for several years, personal income rose by 4.2 percent, ranking second in the state, according to newly released Bureau of Economic Analysis figures. Breece said the state’s northern region has had solid, but not amazing, economic growth since the 2008–09 recession. He said the figures likely reflect the exodus of people from the area, adding Aroostook County’s population dropped by more than 1 percent last year and many people who left were likely looking for better job opportunities and would have negatively affected the county’s average income.

WABI Covers Annual Laurence Jones Memorial

Friday, November 21st, 2014

WABI (Channel 5) reported on an annual memorial service held at the University of Maine honoring the life of Laurence A. Jones, Jr., a 1992 UMaine graduate who held a psychology degree. Jones was killed while he was a graduate student at Johns Hopkins University. Jones’ mother, Yong Jones, established a scholarship in memory him to be awarded to students who demonstrate excellence in psychology. This year’s recipient, Amber Rowley, spoke at the event that was held near the Laurence A. Jones, Jr. memorial tree on campus. “The recipient today — Amber Rowley — is also planning to study and also work in the field of child psychology and so we are hoping that she will do that and continue on the living memory of Laurence,” said Jeffery Mills, president and CEO of the University of Maine Foundation. Yong Jones attended the memorial.

Morse Speaks to Free Press About Fish Farming for Food Tour Report

Friday, November 21st, 2014

Dana Morse, a Maine Sea Grant researcher who works at the University of Maine’s Darling Marine Center, was quoted in an article published by The Free Press about Maine Foodie Tours — tours of restaurants and markets that offer local food — coming to Rockland in the summer of 2015. The Rockland tour will include information on Maine aquaculture. Morse said fish farming in the state is booming. He listed mussels, hard- and soft-shell clams, scallops, sugar kelp, oysters and salmon as the focus of sea-farm industries in Maine.

UMaine Extension Mentioned in Guardian Article on Maine’s Artisan Grain Industry

Thursday, November 20th, 2014

The University of Maine Cooperative Extension was mentioned in an article published by The Guardian that looks at Maine’s growing artisan grain industry. The article focuses on Skowhegan’s Somerset Grist Mill and Maine Grains, a wholesaler producing stone-milled flour and related products from grains grown by local farmers. “Lots of people are experimenting and working to get the quality of grain to a place where they can sell it,” said  Amber Lambke, co-founder of Somerset Grist Mill and Maine Grains. “The University of Maine Cooperative Extension has been studying organic bread wheat production in Maine and are supporting the farmers to grow grains.

Brady Named Maine Sea Grant’s Assistant Director for Research, Boothbay Register Reports

Thursday, November 20th, 2014

The Boothbay Register reported Damian Brady, an assistant research professor in the University of Maine’s School of Marine Sciences at the Darling Marine Center, has been appointed the assistant director for research at Maine Sea Grant. Brady’s research combines approaches from disciplines including marine biology, biogeochemistry and environmental engineering to address questions about water quality and ecosystem function. Brady will oversee Maine Sea Grant’s research portfolio and will manage the next request for research proposals in early 2015. He will serve as a liaison between Sea Grant faculty, students and staff at UMaine and other research institutions, and the Marine Extension Team.

UMaine Extension Cranberry Facts Cited in Michigan State University Article

Thursday, November 20th, 2014

Data provided by the University of Maine Cooperative Extension was mentioned in the Michigan State University Extension article, “Why do we eat cranberries at Thanksgiving?” According to UMaine Extension, American Indians used cranberries as a food source, to dye fabric and as medicine, the article states. Due to the importance of cranberries in the 1500s and their abundance, it is believed the pilgrims and the American Indians would have eaten them at the first Thanksgiving, the article continues.

UMaine Weather Statistics Cited in USA Today Report

Wednesday, November 19th, 2014

University of Maine data was mentioned in the USA Today report, “Snow way! U.S. ‘hammered’ by freak freeze, whiteout.” According to UMaine, the eastern half of North America is the only part of the Northern Hemisphere that’s experiencing dramatically below-average, frigid temperatures, the report states. Overall, the hemisphere is about 1.35 degrees warmer than average for Nov. 18.

PBS NewsHour Reports on Climate Change Research by Kreutz, Student in Alaska

Tuesday, November 18th, 2014

PBS NewsHour reported on research by University of Maine paleoclimatologist Karl Kreutz in a video titled “Scientists read layers of Alaska’s ice and snow to track climate change.” With support from the National Science Foundation, Kreutz and his team are working to reconstruct the climate history of the area around Alaska’s Denali National Park over the last thousand years. The researchers are studying ice depth measurements to determine the relationship between temperature and precipitation rate, and the response of glaciers to climate changes. Seth Campbell, a UMaine alumnus and geophysicist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and Abigail Bradford, an undergraduate student in the UMaine School of Earth and Climate Sciences, also were featured in the video. “There’s thousands of glaciers in Alaska, and very few have had data gathered on them. So we’re hoping to piece that puzzle together,” Bradford said.

UMaine Cited in Mainebiz Article on Seaweed Farming

Tuesday, November 18th, 2014

The University of Maine was mentioned in a Mainebiz article about seaweed farming and the expansion of Maine Coast Sea Vegetables, a Down East company that sells sea vegetables as whole foods. According to UMaine’s Maine Sea Grant, there are more than 250 species of sea vegetables in the Gulf of Maine. Although most are edible, fewer than a dozen are commercially harvested, the article states. In 2013, Maine Coast Sea Vegetables began working with the UMaine’s Center for Cooperative Aquaculture Research (CCAR) in Franklin and Maine Sea Grant to develop seeded nets and ropes for aquaculture production, the article states. Sea Grant’s research on seaweed farming that is building on research conducted by Susan Brawley, a professor of plant biology in the School of Marine Sciences and a cooperating professor in the School of Biology and Ecology, also was mentioned. “There’s a lot of momentum, as a new industry,” said Sarah Redmond, a marine extension agent for Maine Sea Grant at CCAR, of seaweed farming.

Dean Dana, Students Speak with Media About Updated Sex Assault Policy

Tuesday, November 18th, 2014

WVII (Channel 7) spoke with Robert Dana, the University of Maine’s vice president for student life and dean of students, about the updated policy on sexual assault and harassment that recently was approved by the University of Maine System trustees. The policy strengthens the definition of “consent” to better align with new federal regulations. “What we are trying to do now — we have been for the last two years — is creating a cultural climate where people will say what’s going on with them, what’s happened to them, what they’re concerned about, what their fears are,” Dana said. The Maine Public Broadcasting Network also reported on the updated policy and interviewed UMaine students Megan Dood and Julie Churchill about the changes. The students agreed the policy changes are a step in the right direction, but a change in culture is still needed.