Archive for the ‘UMaine in the News’ Category

Kelley Quoted in Free Press Article on Proposed Searsport Dredging Project

Friday, July 31st, 2015

Joseph Kelley, a professor of marine geology in the University of Maine School of Earth and Climate Sciences and Climate Change Institute, was quoted in a Free Press article on a proposed U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) dredging project in Searsport. The decision on whether to approve the project to dredge 929,000 cubic yards of bottom sediments from Searsport Harbor is likely to be made by the end of the year after a public hearing this fall, according to the article. The project aims to enlarge the shipping channel and deposit the dredge spoils in the bay six miles away off the tip of Islesboro, the report states. One concern among residents is the dump site, which was chosen by the USACE because it has natural depressions that can be filled with dredge spoils. According to Kelley, the methane that created the pockmarks is still there. He conducted studies of the area two decades ago and advised against dumping dredge spoils at the site when he served as state geologist. Kelley recommended conducting dump tests in the area and tracking resulting sediment plumes to see if they spread, the article states.

UMaine Research Cited in Saga Report on Beneficial Foods, Drinks for Brain Power

Friday, July 31st, 2015

Research conducted at the University of Maine was mentioned in the Saga article, “10 ways to feed your brain.” Since 60 percent of the human brain is made of fat, it needs a steady supply of healthy fats, plus other key nutrients, to function at its best, according to the article. The report lists 10 foods and drinks that can boost brain power, including milk. Adults who consume milk or other dairy products daily perform better in brain function tests than those who rarely or never touch dairy, scientists from the University of Maine and University of South Australia have found. The researchers suggest the effect may stem from the specific mix of nutrients found in dairy, which includes calcium, whey protein, vitamin D and magnesium.

Crittenden Writes BDN Article on Advantages of Dating Later in Life

Thursday, July 30th, 2015

Jennifer Crittenden, assistant director of the University of Maine Center on Aging, wrote an article for the Bangor Daily News titled, “The advantages of being an older dater, and tips for finding romance.” Nearly 18 percent of adults age 57–64, and 14 percent of adults ages 65–74 are in a dating relationship, the article states. “Being in a relationship can improve health, well-being and expand social support,” Crittenden wrote.

Kersbergen’s Weed Control Strategies Cited in Valley News Article on Bedstraw

Thursday, July 30th, 2015

Richard Kersbergen, a University of Maine Cooperative Extension educator on sustainable dairy and forage systems, was mentioned in a Valley News article about invasive bedstraw in New Hampshire. Bedstraw has became a concern for farmers as infestations crowd other plants and take over patches of ground and entire fields, according to the article. The problem with bedstraw is that it’s of little value for feeding livestock, the article states. The report cites Kersbergen’s four different control strategies, each with its own costs and limitations. His strategies include rotating fields, increasing nitrogen fertilizer, applying the herbicide glyphosate or trying one of the powerful new herbicide products that manufacturers say will be more effective against bedstraw. Kersbergen’s studies also show that if the prior year’s seed rain isn’t prevented, the money and hassle most likely won’t make a difference, the article states.

CCAR, Acadia Harvest Featured on WABI

Thursday, July 30th, 2015

WABI (Channel 5) reported on Acadia Harvest Inc., a startup business housed at the University of Maine’s Center for Cooperative Aquaculture Research (CCAR) in Franklin. The business grows black sea bass and California yellowtail using sustainable land-based aquaculture production. “There are a lot of things here that we do better than what they get in the wild,” said Kevin Neves, product and operations manager at Acadia Harvest. “For example, the fish here never get hungry. They’re always being fed. That’s something a fish in the wild doesn’t get, so fish here grow faster than they would in the wild.” Currently the company is working with a batch of 5,000 fish — the next batch will be double, according to the report. Ed Robinson, chairman and CEO of Acadia Harvest, said he eventually would like to be able to support as many as 200 thousand fish per year, or about 1 million pounds. “I think the story of a local Maine-grown fish is also attractive to people, and we’d like to bring investment and jobs back into Maine and help build a serious business,” he said.

Former Quarterback to Coach at UMaine, BDN Reports

Thursday, July 30th, 2015

The Bangor Daily News reported former University of Maine quarterback Marcus Wasilewski has joined the school’s sports performance staff as a coach. The sports performance coaches assist athletes with speed, strength and conditioning, according to the article. Wasilewski has served the past three months in an interim role as assistant strength coach and nutrition adviser with the Black Bears. He achieved his Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist certification in July and has worked as a graduate assistant of exercise physiology at UMaine, the article states. “Marcus was a great performer here as a Black Bear student-athlete. We have high expectations from him and have great confidence that he will be an outstanding teacher, coach and role model,” head football coach Jack Cosgrove said.

Foster’s Advances Judd’s ‘Historical Atlas’ Talk in Alfred

Thursday, July 30th, 2015

Foster’s reported University of Maine historian Richard Judd will speak as part of a series in Alfred sponsored by The Friends of Alfred Shaker Museum and the Sanford-Springvale Historical Society. On Oct. 4, Judd will discuss the newly published “Historical Atlas of Maine.” The atlas is a geographical and historical interpretation of the state, from the end of the last ice age to 2000. It culminates a 15-year scholarly project led by UMaine researchers. Judd and UMaine geographer Stephen Hornsby edited the book that contains cartography by Michael Hermann. The series is offered with support from the Maine Humanities Council, Kennebunk Savings Bank, the Alfred Historical Society and individual donors.

UMaine Extension Blueberry Statistics Cited in Wiscasset Newspaper Article

Thursday, July 30th, 2015

The University of Maine Cooperative Extension was mentioned in the Wiscasset Newspaper article, “Wild blueberries are ripe for the picking.”

Maine’s wild blueberries ripen in midsummer and the picking is usually best following a wet spring, according to the article. UMaine Extension estimates there are more than 40,000 acres of wild blueberries statewide, the article states.

PRI Cites CCI Researchers in Article on Climate Change Effects in Greenland

Wednesday, July 29th, 2015

PRI’s “The World” mentioned two University of Maine researchers in the article, “Here’s what climate change looks like from the edge of the Greenland icecap.” According to the article, Greenland is melting fast, which is bad news for sea level rise and other effects of climate change. Glaciologist Gordon Hamilton, an associate professor in the Climate Change Institute and School of Earth and Climate Sciences, is leading a research team in Greenland. His team is using laser-mapping to image the calving of Helheim Glacier into Sermilik fjord in unprecedented detail, according to the article. The report also included photos of icebergs in Greenland contributed by Ellyn Enderlin, a research assistant professor in CCI and School of Earth and Climate Sciences.

Student Entrepreneur Featured in Sun Journal

Wednesday, July 29th, 2015

The Sun Journal published an article on James Barker, a University of Maine senior studying business finance, and his pellet business. Barker of Turner is director of operations and sales for his family’s business, Barker Enterprises Inc.’s Wood Pellet Warehouse on Route 17 in North Jay, according to the article. The business also has a satellite location on Route 4 in Turner. Barker handles all management and coordination of deliveries from Orono, the article states. “I’m a very driven and outgoing individual. Not many kids would work 80 hours a week,” he said. “What drives me is achievement. I want to be the best.”